History of the Music Program: 2007-2008

First Parish Unitarian Universalist of Arlington

 

2007-2008
Director of Music: Laura Stanfield Prichard
Organist/Pianist: Sarah Haera Tocco

Sunday, September 9
Water Communion Service
The Musical Legacy of Edward Elgar

  • Prelude: Improvisation on Deep River by Jim Austin, piano
  • Chalice Lighting Music: Excerpt from the 1923 opera The Perfect Fool by Gustav Holst (1874-1934)
    First Parish UUlations, directed by Jennifer Kobayashi from the balcony
    Water clear, water pure,
    Never failing friend art thou.
    Why do the poets never sing of thee,
    Water pure, water clear?
    As each day dawns we bring our pitchers,
    Greeting thee and singing thy praise.
  • Anthem: As Torrents in Summer (1896) by Sir Edward Elgar (1857-1934) in celebration of Elgar's 150th Birthday Year and of Longfellow's 200th Birthday Year
    Notes: Edward Elgar wrote part-songs for unaccompanied mixed-voice choir throughout his composing life. Many of these are miniature masterpieces - inventive and profound. The unaccompanied chorus As Torrents in Summer was composed as the finale of his cantata King Olaf. After depicting events in the life of a Norse crusader, Elgar saves the best music for the epilogue. A recapitulation of a number of earlier themes leads into this unaccompanied and soulful final chorus, bringing the work to an moving climax which Elgar hardly equalled in any of his later works.

    As torrents in summer,
    Half dried in their channels,
    Suddenly rise, though the
    Sky is still cloudless,
    For rain has been falling
    Far off at their fountains;

    So hearts that are fainting
    Grow full to o'erflowing,
    And they that behold it
    Marvel, and know not
    That God at their fountains
    Far off has been raining!
    - by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) from his epic poem The Nun of Nidaros
  • Candle Music: Afton Water (Scottish Folk Tune) arranged by Sir David Willcocks (1919-)
    Flow gently, sweet Afton, among thy green braes!
    Flow gently, I'll sing thee a song in thy praise!
    My Mary's asleep by thy murmuring stream,
    Flow gently, sweet Afton, disturb not her dream.

    Thou stock-dove, whose echo resounds thro' the glen,
    Ye wild whistling blackbirds in yon thorny den,
    Thou green-crested lapwing, thy screaming forbear,
    I charge you disturb not my slumbering fair.

    How lofty, sweet Afton, thy neighbouring hills,
    Far mark'd with the courses of clear winding rills;
    There daily I wander as noon rises high,
    My flocks and my Mary's sweet cot in my eye.

    How pleasant thy banks and green valleys below,
    Where wild in the woodlands the primroses blow;
    There oft, as mild Ev'ning sweeps over the lea,
    The sweet-scented birk [birch] shades my Mary and me.

    Thy crystal stream, Afton, how lovely it glides,
    And winds by the cot where my Mary resides,
    How wanton thy waters her snowy feet lave,
    As gathering sweet flowrets she stems thy clear wave.

    Flow gently, sweet Afton, among thy green braes [hills],
    Flow gently, sweet river, the theme of my lays;
    My Mary's asleep by thy murmuring stream,
    Flow gently, sweet Afton, disturb not her dream.
    - by Robert Burns (1759-1796)
  • Choral Water Music: To Be Sung on the Water, op. 42, no.2 (1969) by Samuel Barber (1910-1981)
    Click here to hear all parts played
    Click here for an article of the poet Louise Bogan and the text of the poem
    Notes: Samuel Barber's music represents the confluence of twentieth-century tonal harmonies and nineteenth-century structures. Both a pianist and a baritone of some repute, Barber is principally known as a composer of songs and of music for piano. His vocal lines always respond to the contours and meaning of the text, and his choral compositions show influences of British Romanticism and in particular the a cappella choral output of Elgar, Stanford, and Parry. The part-song To be sung on the water is a restrained, lyrical setting of a Louise Bogan poem. At one point, Barber intended to insert this song into Antony and Cleopatra, his final opera, but ultimately decided against it; however, he had enough affection for the piece that he asked that it be performed at his funeral. Heard in every bar of the piece, a slow, lapping motive comprising two sixteenth notes followed by a quarter note suggests the paddling of oars. Against this rhythm appears a long, lyrical outpouring, first given to the sopranos and altos and then to the tenors and basses. Instead of building to a climax, we are given a slow, quiet coda which "like an echo" recedes into the eternal quiet.
  • Instrumental Water Music: Improvisation on Peace Like a River by Jim Austin
  • Offertory: Deep River by Harry T. Burleigh
    Baritone Septet of the First Parish Choir with Laura Prichard, piano
  • Postlude: Gospel Improvisation on Down by the Riverside by Jim Austin
  • Hymns & Readings: 162, 209, 347, 729

Sunday, September 16 Music from the Jewish tradition: Bloch's Sacred Service

avodath
Ernest Bloch (1880-1959) was a Swiss-born, Jewish composer who immigrated to the United States. He composed the Sacred Service between 1930 and 1933 in response to a commission from Temple Emanuel in San Francisco. The text comes from the Reform Jewish service for the Sabbath Morning given in the Union Prayer Book of 1922. Bloch focused mainly on the Hebrew portions of the liturgy that are sung by the cantor and choir.

Bloch’s first task upon accepting the commission was to undertake a careful study of the Hebrew text. He knew only a little Hebrew from his childhood, so he made a meticulous, word-by-word translation. He wrote to friends in San Francisco, “I have now memorized entirely the whole Service in Hebrew. I can write it in Hebrew from memory…But what is more important, I have absorbed it to the point that it has become mine and as if it were the very expression of my soul.” The music reflects this intimate understanding of the text; from moment to moment the piece unfolds as an absolute depiction of the words.

The work is in five sections. The first part includes prayers of preparation and praise and concludes with Tzur Yisroel, the only instance in the piece where Bloch used an already-existing melody. Part Two is the Sanctification. Part Three focuses on the preparations for reading the Torah, beginning with the Silent Devotion and response. Part Four is a thanksgiving for the Torah and ends with one of the crucial texts in the work; Bloch labels it “a peace song.” The fifth and final part is an Epilogue. It includes an extensive section in English that emphasizes Bloch’s desire for universalism in the work. The piece concludes with a setting of Adon Olam, a hymn that actually belongs to the Friday evening service.

The music unfolds continuously, with very little repetition. It is bound together by a six-note melody that occurs at the very beginning and returns in various guises throughout the piece. The overall tone is reverent, in keeping with Bloch’s desire for music that would express his respect for the text and its meaning. He hoped that it would be universal, in the tradition of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony or Missa Solemnis: “While it is named the Sacred Service or Sabbath morning service, it embraces the whole of humanity, rather than a creed or sect….For fifty minutes I hope it will bring to the souls, minds, and hearts of the people a little more confidence, make them a little more kind and indulgent than they were, and bring them peace. I have not written to astonish the world with a spectacular achievement. I have a message to deliver—that is all.”

  • Prelude: Hear Ye, Israel from Elijah by Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)
    Sarah Haera Tocco, organ
  • Sounding of the Shofar: Tekiya
    Dorothy May, shofar & Andee Rubin, cantor
  • Candle Music: Silent Devotion and Response from Ernest Bloch's (1880-1959) Avodath Hakodesh (1933)
    This third movement of Bloch's Sacred Service starts with a meditation. The orchestra/organ alone is heard, allowing the listeners a moment to formulate their own thoughts in silent prayer. Then the choir, a cappella, quietly intones Yihyu Lerotson, the prayer for acceptance. The composer called this section "a silent meditation which comes in before you take your soul out and look at what it contains." The most important part of any Jewish prayer is the introspection it provides, the moment that we spend looking inside ourselves, seeing our role in the universe.
    Translation: O Lord, may the words of my mouth and the meditations of my heart be acceptable before Thee, Adonoi, my Rock and Redeemer. Amen (So be it).
    [Side thought on the word Adonai] - Adonai comes from the root word "Adon," which means lord. A king would be referred to as Lord, or actually any person of high status. In modern Israel, Adon is used as "mister", as in Adon Bloch = Mr. Bloch. A related word, Adoni (pronounced adonee), means "my lord," and is used as a form of respect. Adonai means Lord in the divine sense (as in this prayer): this is what confused the gospel writers, who didn't know Hebrew, and thus didn't know that Jesus was being referred to as Adoni, because he was a teacher.
  • Offertory: Consolation No. 3 in D-flat by Franz Liszt (1811-1886)
  • Anthem: Avinu malkeinu from the Sacred Service by Max Janowski (1912-1991)
    Michael Prichard, baritone
    Translation - Hear our voice, O father, pity and be compassionate to us, and accept, with compassion and favour, our prayers. Traditional prayer for Yom Kippur
    Notes - Max Janowski was born in Berlin, Germany. He was a prodigious 20th-century composer, conductor, and organist whose liturgical compositions have been performed in concert halls, synagogues, churches and colleges throughout the world. He emigrated to Japan and then to New York in 1937. He was the beloved music director, organist, and choir director at six Chicago-area synagogues and Unitarian congregations.
  • Benediction: Benediction from Bloch's Avodath Hakodesh
    Andrew Leonard, tenor
    All Shabbat services end with this traditional text: May the Lord bless you and keep you, and the light of his countenance shine upon you and be gracious to you, and lift up his face to you, and give you peace. Amen.
    This prayer from Bloch's Sacred Service features the traditional text that concludes most Shabbat services. It emphasizes Bloch’s desire for universalism in the work, in the tradition of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony or Missa Solemnis: “While it is named the Sacred Service, it embraces the whole of humanity, rather than one creed or sect. I hope it will bring to the souls, minds, and hearts of people a little more confidence, make them a little more kind and indulgent than they were, and bring them peace. I have not written to astonish the world with a spectacular achievement. I have a message to deliver—that is all.”
  • Postlude: Toccata by Dietrich Buxtehude (1637-1707)
    Buxtehude was a German-Danish organist and the most highly regarded keyboard composer of his generation. In 1705, J.S. Bach, then a young man of twenty, walked to Lübeck (more than 400km) and stayed nearly three months to meet the pre-eminent Lübeck organist, hear him play, and (as Bach explained) "to comprehend one thing and another about his art."
  • Hymns & Readings: 1, 205, 298, 414, 634, Psalm 110:4, The Rabbi

Sunday, September 23
Rev. John Marsh “The Forming Edge of Our Lives”
Music from the Jewish Diaspora: Berlin and Canada

  • Prelude: Peace to My Soul by William Barnett
    Sarah Haera Tocco, organ
  • Sounding of the Shofar: Tekiya
    Jean Renard Ward, shofar & Laura Prichard, cantor
  • Candle Music: Unataneh tokef by Louis Lewandowski (1823-1894)
    Mies Boet-Whitaker, Allison Lacasse, Ted Live, and Stephanie Franzosa, flutes
    Notes: Louis Lewandowski was a German composer of synagogal music, and a cousin of Leon Leopold Lewandowski, the well-known Warsaw orchestral conductor and composer of many popular Polish dances and operas. Lewandowski was born on April 23, 1823 in Prussia, (now Wrzesnia, Poland). At the age of twelve he went to Berlin to study piano and voice, and became solo soprano in the synagogue. He attended the school of composition of the Berlin Academy, graduated with high honors, and was appointed in 1840 choirmaster of the Berlin synagogue. In that capacity he rendered invaluable services in the development of music for synagogue ritual. His principal works include: Kol Rinnah u-Tefillah, for chorus; Todah ve-Zimrah, for mixed chorus, solo, and organ; the Yom Kippur cantata Unataneh Tokef, 40 psalm settings, symphonies, overtures, cantatas, and songs. In 1866 he received the title of "royal musical director." Shortly afterward, he was appointed choirmaster in the Neue Synagogue, Berlin, for which he composed the entire musical service. His arrangements of ancient cantorial for choir, cantor, and organ are considered masterly productions, characterized by great simplicity and a profound religious sentiment. Many of Lewandowski's pupils became prominent cantors.
  • Offertory: Clair de Lune by Achille-Claude Debussy (1862-1918)
    Sarah Haera Tocco, piano
  • Anthem: Shalom Rav by Ben Steinberg (1930-)
    Laurie Francis-Wright, cantor
    Notes: Composer Ben Steinberg, son of the late Cantor Alexander Steinberg, was born in Winnipeg, Canada and educated at Toronto's Royal Conservatory of Music and the University of Toronto. Involved in traditional synagogue music since childhood (he was a child soloist at age eight and conducted his first synagogue choir at age twelve) his career is a long and distinguished one. Having served Toronto's Temple Sinai as Director of Music since 1970, Mr. Steinberg was appointed its Composer-in-Residence in 1996. He is a widely-recognized conductor and lecturer, noted for his lecture-recitals on Jewish music history and style at major centers and universities in Canada and the U.S., including Cornell University, where he has twice been invited as Dean Sage Speaker. His works have been commissioned by numerous synagogues and other groups such as: The Royal Canadian College of Organists; The American Guild of Organists; Yale University in conjunction with Union Theological Seminary and Hebrew Union College (NYC); and The American Conference of Cantors. He was invited by Israel's 1988 Zimriah (Choral Festival) to lecture on his choral compositions. Earlier, he was honored twice by the city of Jerusalem, which invited him to be an artist-in-residence at its creative retreat, "Mishkenot Sha'ananim" - an honor then reserved for composers, artists and writers of international stature.
  • Postlude: Prelude in C Major for Organ by Johann Sebastian Bach
  • Hymns & Readings: 40, 128, 219, 414, 633, Losers by Carl Sandburg                       

Sunday, September 30
“The Writing on the Wall” Rev. John Marsh

  • Prelude: Prelude in B minor by Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849)
  • Candle Music: The Blue Bird by Charles V. Stanford (1852–1924) in celebration of Stanford's 155th Birthday
    Jennifer Kobayashi, soprano
    Happy 155th Birthday today to Sir Charles Villiers Stanford, a virtuoso Irish organist and longtime Professor of Music at Cambridge University. Stanford's first serious piano teacher, Elizabeth Meeke, introduced him to the masterworks of Chopin and Beethoven. In 1862, he played Chopin's Prelude in B Minor (today's Prelude music) for the famous concert pianist Sigismund Thalberg and won a scholarship to Cambridge University, where he focused on choral and symphonic composition.
  • Offertory: Andante grazioso by Gaston-Marie Dethier (1875-1958)
    Mies Boet-Whitaker, flute
    Gaston-Marie Dethier was a virtuoso Belgian organist and pianist. He took first prize in piano from the Royal Conservatory of Liège, and then emigrated to the U.S. where he taught at the Juilliard School from the 1920s-1940s and dedicated many American and Canadian organs.
  • Anthem: Beati quorum via, op. 38, no. 3 by Sir Charles V. Stanford in celebration of Stanford's 155th Birthday
    Translation: Blessed are those who act with integrity, who walk according to the way of the Lord. Psalm 119: 1
    Stanford was the son of Irish musicians and made his name in England as an improvisatory organist. His three Latin motets were composed in 1905 during his first years in Cambridge, where he began as the Organ Scholar of Queen's College. By the time he was just twenty he was in the employ of Trinity, where he revolutionized the music-making of the college. Stanford also studied in Leipzig and Berlin; he was a professor at both the Royal College of Music and at Cambridge University for over forty years, was the main composition teacher of Edward Elgar and Ralph Vaughan Williams, and is buried in Westminster Abbey next to composer Henry Purcell. Beati quorum via, set in a rich six-part texture, clearly pays homage to Brahms with its flowing lines, lingering suspensions and rich harmonic language.
  • Postlude: Gebet (Prayer) by Ludwig van Beethoven
    Beethoven's family originated from Brabant, in Belgium. His father, a musician at the Court of Bonn, dreamed of molding his son into the next Mozart. The young Beethoven was unusually talented, studying the piano, organ and violin and winning his first professional appointment (as an organist) at the court of Maximillian Franz, the Elector of Cologne, where he wrote many songs, including Prayer.
  • Hymns & Readings: 12, 169, 210, 414, 591, Genesis 19:23, excerpt from The Local Church and Its Archives by Conrad Wright, quoted by Charles Grady in Arlington's First Parish

Sunday, October 7 Columbus Day Weekend
“Stories from Sudan” Rev. Carlton E. Smith on International Relief

  • Prelude: Adagio by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
  • Candle Music: Call to Remembrance  by Richard Farrant (1530-1580)
  • Offertory: Reflets dans l'eau by Achille-Claude Debussy (1862-1918)
  • Anthem: Freedom Is Coming (South African marching song)
  • Postlude: Voluntary in D Minor by William Herschel (1738-1822)
  • Hymns & Readings: 6, 172, 414, 601, excerpt from Toni Morrison’s 1993 Nobel Lecture

Sunday, October 14
Ferry Beach Weekend & Association Sunday with Guest Presenter Cherisse Haakonsen, UUA
“Growing Our Church, Growing Our Faith”
2pm Chamber Music Concert by the Weston Wind Quintet featuring Carl Schlaikjer, oboe

  • Prelude: Musette by Jean-François Dandrieu (1782-1838)
  • Candle Music: Humming Chorus from Madama Butterfly by Giacomo Puccini (1858-1924)
  • Offertory: Fantasia by Johann Pachelbel (1653-1706)
  • Postlude: Fugue by William Selby (1738-1798)
    Selby was a gifted organist and composer at King's Chapel in Boston during the time of the American Revolution. A contemporary of William Billings, Selby's organ works are among the earliest American publications for the instrument.
  • Hymns & Readings: 123, 145, 287, 414, 473, 594

Sunday, October 14
2pm Chamber Music Concert by the Weston Wind Quintet featuring Carl Schlaikjer, oboe
Norman Letvin, clarinet; Michael Tabak, flute; Cyrus Stewart, horn; Philip Long, bassoon

  • Passacaille by Adrien Barthe (1828-1898)
  • Quintet in A Major, op. 91, no. 5 by Antoine Reicha (1770-1836)
  • Humorske by Aexander Zeminsky (1871-1942)
  • Wind Quintet in A-flat by Gustav Holst (1874-1934)
  • Kleine Kammermusik für fünf Bläser, op. 24, no. 2 by Paul Hindemith (1895-1963)
  • Carl Schlaikjer, oboe is a longtime member of First Parish Arlington and is currently principal oboe of the Melrose Symphony Orchestra. He has been principal oboe with the Harvard-Radcliffe Orchestra, the MIT Symphony, the Newton Symphony Orchestra, and the New Symphony Orchestra of Newton. He was a founding member of the Weston Wind Quintet. He studied with Louis Speyer (Boston Symphony), Ray Still (Chicago Symphony) at Aspen, and Ralph Gomberg, (Boston Symphony). Dr. Schlaikjer, a research electrochemist, has retired from his position as Chief Scientist with Electrochem Industries, Canton.

Sunday, October 21
Rev. Carlton Elliott Smith - "Going to Guatemala"

  • Prelude: Apamuy Shungu (Giving of the Heart) by Gerardo Guevara (b. 1930, Ecuador)
    Click here to read about Guevara's work with Amazonian rhythms.
    Click here to view a video performance of the song by the Instituto Las Condes Corouniandes.
    Notes - This hymn to the sun is based on a traditional Nicaraguan melody in Quicha, one of Ecuador's indigenous spoken languages. Educated at the National Conservatory of Music in Quito, where he won composition and conducting prizes, Guevara was able to teach music and to study in Paris, France with Nadia Boulanger under a UNESCO grant. He directed the choir of the Central Univerisity of Ecuador for twenty years and was Director of the National Conservatory 1980-1988. His compositions include ballets, orchestral suites, string quartets, choral works, and transcriptions of Amazonian rain forest dances.
  • Candle Music: Come Where My Love Lies Dreaming by Stephen Foster, arranged by Donald Hunsberger
    First Parish Symphonic Band with Brad Amidon and Michelle Markus, duet
  • Offertory: Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair by Stephen Foster, arranged by Donald Hunsberger
    First Parish Symphonic Band with Brad Amidon and Michelle Markus, duet
  • Anthem: Mata del Anima Sola by Antonio Estevez (b. 1930, Venezuela)
    Jean Renard Ward, tenor solo
  • Hymns & Readings: 124, 135, 318, 414, 588, Companero by Juan Esquivel

Sunday, October 28 Hallowe'en Service

  • Prelude: Toccata in D Minor by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
  • Parade: Enter, Rejoice, and Come In #361 & When the Saints Go Marching In
  • Story: Heckety Peg by Audrey Wood
    Pete Costello, Will Costello, Abby Galantowicz, Sorrel Galantowicz, Anne Goodwin, Robert Herrelson, Marie Meteer, Patrick Meteer-McDonald, Lean Meteer-McDonald, Tina Schultz
  • Musical Meditation: In a Sentimental Mood by Edward "Duke" Ellington (1899-1974)
    First Parish Symphonic Band led by Steve Carmody, alto saxophone solo
  • Offertory: Fantasy of Flight Medley by John Williams
    Theme
    from E.T., Hedwig's Theme from Harry Potter, and Main Title from Star Wars
    First Parish Family Orchestra
  • Postlude: Toccata and Fuga Obnoxia by P.D.Q. Bach
    Sarah Haera Tocco, organ; Chalice Singers, recorder choir; Andrew Leonard, Andy Kobayashi, Jennifer Kobayashi, Carolyn Hodges, and Jean Reanard Ward, percussion (Chinese gong, fire gong, samba whistle, castanets, triangle, bass drum, tambourine, etc.)
  • Hymns & Readings: 409 with Chalice Singers Bell Choir, A Prayer for Children by Ina Hughes, God Bless the Moon

Sunday, November 4
Rev. John N. Marsh - "Considering Time"

  • Prelude: Jim Austin, piano
  • Candle Music: Yesterday by John Lennon & Paul McCartney
    Jacques Duranceau, tenor solo and the First Parish Adult Choir
  • Offertory: Over the Rainbow by Harold Arlen
    First Parish UUlations, led by Jennifer Kobayashi
  • Anthem: Tranquility by Diane Taraz Shriver
    First Parish UUlations, led by Jennifer Kobayashi
  • Postlude: When I'm Sixty-Four by John Lennon & Paul McCartney
    First Parish UUlations, led by Jennifer Kobayashi
  • Hymns & Readings: 38, 139, 350, 414, reading from Ecclesiastes

Sunday, November 11
Carlton E. Smith "The Perfect Teacher" Post-Election Guatemala Report & the democratic process

  • Prelude: Prelude in G Minor by Arthur Bird
  • Candle Music: Mata del Anima Sola (Tree of the Lonely Soul) by Antonio Estévez (1916-1988, Venezuela)
    Jean Renard Ward, tenor solo
    Notes on the poetry: The dramatic poetry of educator and politician Alberto Torrealba (1918-1971) focused on solitary, heroic figures. His greatest poem is the epic Florentino y el diablo, a Faustian tale set on the Venezuelan plains.
    Translation: Tree of the lonely soul, wide opening of the riverside, now you will be able to say, "Here slept the clear-voiced one." With the whistle and sting of the twisting wind, the dappled and violet dusk entered the corral. The night, a tired mare, shakes her mane and black tail above the river; and, in its silence, your ghostly heart is filled with awe.
    Notes on the composer: Antonio Estévez (1916-1998) was the musical founder/composer of the Central University of Venezuela Chorale and the Phonology Music Institute at the Simon Bolivar Center (Venezuela). In the 1930s, he played oboe with the Caracas Military Band and the Venezuela Symphony Orchestra and was awarded the National Music Prize (like our Pulitzer) in 1949. In the 1960s he was an influential contributor at the Research Center for French Broadcasting in Paris.
  • Offertory: Moments musicaux no. 5 in D-flat by Sergei Rachmaninoff
  • Anthem: Kyrie (Give Us Peace) from the Misa Criolla of Ariel Ramírez (b. 1921, Argentina)
    Michael Prichard, tenor solo
    Notes: The text is ada;pted from the Catholic mass: "Señor, have mercy on us. Grant us peace." Ariel Ramirez was born in Santa Fe, Argentina in 1921, and is now President of the Society of Authors and Composers in Argentina (SADAIC). As a student, Ramirez was fascinated with the music of the gauchos and creoles in the mountains, and collected Argentinian folk music and traditional rhythms. Composed in 1964, the Misa Criolla is by far his best-known composition. Entirely based on traditional rhythms, it is also, being contemporary to the Second Vatican Council, one of the first masses to be celebrated in a modern language. It was premiered under Ramirez's direction on a European tour that brought the composer before Pope Paul VI.
  • Postlude: Fantasia in C Major by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
  • Hymns & Readings: 51, 352, 414, 558, 656, When Things Fall Apart by Pema Chödrön

Sunday, November 18 Requiem Service

"Thanksgiving" Rev. John Marsh
Requiem by Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924)
Sarah Haera Tocco, organ
Virginia Crumb, harp

Click here to practice each movement by individual part (midi)
Click here to practice each movement by individual part (piano plays all parts separately and organ accompanies, the links are one page down "Winter '04" or "Winter '03," and you may click on the voice part that interests you)
Click here to hear the sixth movement (Libera me) in a live recording by the Salt Lake Choral Artists
Click here to hear the sixth movement (Libera me) in a live recording by the VU-Kamerkoor Amsterdam
Click here to hear the seventh movement (In paradisum) in a live recording by the VU-Kamerkoor Amsterdam

  • Prelude: Introitus & Kyrie
  • Candle Music: Sanctus
  • Offertory: Agnus Dei & Lux aeterna
  • Anthem: Libera me
  • Postlude: In paradisum
  • Hymns & Readings: 290, 331, 349, 414, 656

Sunday, November 25
Carlton E. Smith on the Value of Membership: "Over the Years"
Reflections by Jim Ptacek (2002), Ann Abbott (1992), and Dick Terry (1972)

  • Prelude: Mélodie by Louis-Claude Daquin
  • Candle Music: Intermezzo in A Major from op. 76 by Johannes Brahms
  • Offertory: Andante moderato from Trio Sonata BWV 1039 by Johann Sebastian Bach
    Mies Boet-Whitaker, flute; Carl Schlaikjer, oboe
  • Anthem: Libera me
  • Postlude: In paradisum
  • Hymns & Readings: 158, 300, 317, 414, 359, Giving Thanks by Chief Jake Swamp, Excerpt from Becoming a Member by Polly Guild

Sunday, December 2 First Sunday of Advent
John W. Marsh "Advent"
Carol History online - www.oremus.org

  • Vocal Prelude: Veni, veni Emmanuel (Medieval Latin carol based on Gregorian chant)
    First Parish UUlations, directed by Jennifer Kobayashi
  • Candle Music: Lo, How a Rose/When You Believe
    First Parish UUlations, directed by Jennifer Kobayashi
  • Offertory: Gabriel's Message (The Angel Gabriel from Heaven Came)
    Text and organ recording at: http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/t/t071.html
    Video version by Sting (2006): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GF2BzUDeTkY
    This carol is based on a Basque one, Birjina gaztettobat zegoen, collected by Charles Bordes and published in the series Archives de la tradition basque, 1895. The Rev. Sabine Baring-Gould, who wrote several novels and hymns (including Onward, Christian Soldiers) and who had spent a winter as a boy in Basque lands, translated the carol into English, reducing the original six stanzas to four and giving Gabriel the very beautiful and very Victorian "wings as drifted snow." It quotes the biblical account of Mary's Annunciation (Luke I. 26-38) and Mary's Magnificat (Luke 1.46-55).
  • Anthem: Dixit Maria by Hans Leo Hassler
  • Postlude: Ding Dong Merrily on High
    First Parish Flute Loops Chamber Trio
  • Hymns: 224, 225, 226, 414, Luke 1:26-31, 46-54, 2:19, What I Want Is by C. G. Hanzlicek

Sunday, December 2 Chalice Singers trip to Plimoth Plantation
Provided one hour of live music at the 18th Annual Festival of Trees, a benefit for Cape Cod Cranberry Hospice

Monday, December 3 Alliance Intergenerational Party

  • Holiday songs: for Advent, Christmas, and Hannukah
  • Dramatic scene: Lemony Snicket's The Latke Who Couldn't Stop Screaming: A Christmas Story

Sunday, December 9 Music Service
"Vespers and Fanfares" Laura Stanfield Prichard

  • Prelude: Sleigh Ride and Good Swing Wenceslas
    First Parish Intergenerational Symphonic Band
    Ted Live, piccolo; Michelle Markus, Wendy Page, and Andy Kobayashi, clarinets; Steve Carmody and Andy Kobayashi, saxophones; Jean Renard Ward, bassoon, Brad Amidon, trumpet; Alfred Licea, baritone; Chris Botos and Andrew Leonard, trombones; Robert Olsen, double bass; Lorraine Cooley, keyboards; Billy Franzosa, Jennifer Kobayashi, and Michael Prichard, percussion and chamber orchestra members listed below (for the Monteverdi)
  • Reading for Sounding Bells: from In Memoriam by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
    Ring out, wild bells, to the wild sky,
    The flying cloud, the frosty light:
    The year is dying in the night;
    Ring out, wild bells, and let him die.

    Ring out the old, ring in the new,
    Ring, happy bells, across the snow:
    The year is going, let him go;
    Ring out the false, ring in the true. [...]

    Ring out old shapes of foul disease;
    Ring out the narrowing lust of gold;
    Ring out the thousand wars of old,
    Ring in the thousand years of peace.

    Ring in the valiant man and free,
    The larger heart, the kindlier hand;
    Ring out the darkness of the land,
    Ring in the light that is to be.
  • Reading for Chalice Lighting: The Coming of Light (2002) by Mark Strand
    Even this late it happens:
    the coming of love, the coming of light.
    You wake and the candles are lit as if by themselves,
    stars gather, dreams pour into your pillows,
    sending up warm bouquets of air.
    Even this late the bones of the body shine
    and tomorrow's dust flares into breath.
  • Affirmation: 416
  • Chalice Lighting Music: Waltz for Christmas by Kenneth Seitz
    Mies Boet-Whiltaker, flute; Carl Schlaikjer, oboe; Kenneth Seitz, piano
  • Candle Music: Bogoroditse Devo from Sergei Rachmaninoff's Vespers
  • Offertory: Moment Musicaux No. 4 by Sergei Rachmaninoff
  • Anthems: Claudio Monteverdi's Vespro della Beate Virgine (1610)
    Anya, Carolyn and John Hodges, SSB trio (movement II.)
    Andrew Leonard, Jacques Duranceau, and Jean Renard Ward, TTB trio (movement II.)
    Laurie Francis-Wright and Jennifer Kobayashi, soprano duet (movement V. Pulchra es)
    William Henriksen, violin; Carol Lewis, viola da gamba; Chris Henriksen, theorbo
    Mies Boet-Whitaker, Ted Live, Stephanie Franzosa, flutes; Carl Schlaikjer, oboe
    Click here to practice each movement by individual part

    Click here to hear a recording by Cantus Corvinus
  • Benediction: 733
  • Hymns: 13, 36 (verses 1, 2, 4 only), 326

Sunday, December 16 Intergenerational Opera
Amahl & the Night Visitors by Gian Carlo Menotti (1911- in memoriam February 2007)

  • Chalice Lighting Text from Shakespeare's Hamlet
    Some say that ever 'gainst that season comes
    Wherein our Saviour's birth is celebrated,
    This bird of dawning singeth all night long;
    And then, they say, no spirit dare stir abroad,
    The nights are wholesome, then no planets strike,
    No fairy takes, nor witch hath power to charm,
    So hallow'd and so gracious is the time.
  • Affirmation: 621 Why Not a Star
  • Leading Players: Robert Harrelson, Amahl; Heather Kobayashi, page; Susan Gates, Mother; Jean Renard Ward, Kaspar; Michael Prichard, Melchior; John Hodges, Balthazar
  • Orchestra & Shepherd's Chorus: Mies Boet-Whitaker, flute; Carl Schlaikjer, oboe; Michelle Markus, clarinet; Sarah Haera Tocco and Laura Prichard, pianists; Carolyn Hodges, Jennifer Kobayashi, and Mikhaela Houston, soparnos/altos; Lance Levine, Carl Schlaikjer, and Brad Amidon, tenors/basses; Brad Amidon, conductor for Shepherd's Dance
  • Hymns: 254 (verses 1, 2, 4, 5), 255

Sunday, December 23 Intergenerational Solstice Topic

  • Candle Music: 400th Birthday of a Yule Song: Scandinavia and England - The Boar's Head Carol
    Laurie Francis-Wright, Andrew Kobayashi, and Iris Tanner, soloists
    Nineteenth-century antiquarians rediscovered early carols in museums. According to Britannica, about 500 have been found. Some are wassailing songs, some are religious songs in English, some are in Latin, and some are "macaronic" - a mixture of English and Latin. Since most people did not understand Latin, the implication is that these songs were composed for church choristers, or perhaps for an educated audience at the Royal courts. The most famous survival of these early macaronic carols is the The Boar's Head. Allegedly, it has been sung every year at Christ Church Cambridge since December 1607.
    According to folklorists the boar's head "tradition was initiated in all probability on the Isle of Britain by the Anglo-Saxons, although our knowledge of it comes substantially from medieval times....[In ancient Norse tradition] sacrifice carried the intent of imploring Freyr to show favour to the new year. The boar's head with apple in mouth was carried into the banquet hall on a gold or silver dish to the sounds of trumpets and the songs of minstrels." In Scandinavia and England, Saint Stephen may have inherited some of Freyr's legacy. His feast day is December 26 and thus he came to play a part in the Yuletide celebrations which were previously associated with Freyr. In old Swedish art, Stephen is shown as tending to horses and bringing a boar's head to a Yuletide banquet. Both elements are extracanonical and may be pagan survivals. Christmas ham is an old tradition in Sweden and may have originated as a winter solstice boar sacrifice to Freyr.
    The earliest copy of the words, from 1521, was found in The Queen's College, Oxford. At Hurstpierpoint College, in West Sussex, England, the boar's head procession takes place on the first Wednesday in December after a short service in Chapel for all, and heralds the feast which is held to acknowledge the work done by the College's Sacristans and Choir. The Boar's Head is carried on a platter carried by four Sacristans and preceded by the mustard pot carried by a fifth. The remainder of the Senior School lines the cloisters which form three sides of the Inner Quadrangle, the fourth being formed by the Chapel and Dining Hall. The lights are extinguished and the procession, its members carrying candles, moves from the east of the college through the cloisters lined by unusually silent students and back through the Chapel to the vestry.

    The boar's head in hand bear I,
    Bedeck'd with bays and rosemary.
    I pray you, my masters, be merry (Or: And I pray you, my masters, merry be)
    Quot estis in convivio (Translation: As you all feast so heartily)

    CHORUS Caput apri defero (Translation: Lo, behold the head I bring)
    Reddens laudes Domino (Translation: Giving praise to God we sing

    The boar's head, as I understand,
    Is the rarest dish in all this land,
    Which thus bedeck'd with a gay garland
    Let us servire cantico. (Translation: Let us serve with a song)
    CHORUS
    Our steward hath provided this
    In honour of the King of Bliss;
    Which, on this day to be served is
    In Reginensi atrio. (Translation: In the Queen's hall)
    CHORUS
  • Offertory: Germany & America: The Christmas Tree
    O Tannenbaum (1824) by Ernst Anschütz
    The best known version was penned in 1824 by a Leipzig organist and teacher named Ernst Anschütz. The melody is an old folk tune. The first known "Tannenbaum" song lyrics date back to 1550. Rev. Follen of the Lexington UU Church ws the first to decorate a Christmas tree as part of a religious service:
    http://www.hno.harvard.edu/gazette/1996/12.12/ProfessorBrough.html

    O Tannenbaum, o Tannenbaum,
    Wie grün sind deine Blätter!
    Du grünst nicht nur zur Sommerzeit,
    Nein auch im Winter, wenn es schneit.
    O Tannenbaum, o Tannenbaum,
    Wie grün sind deine Blätter!

    O Christmas Tree, O Christmas Tree,
    Your branches green delight us.
    They're green when summer days are bright;
    They're green when winter snow is white.
    O, Christmas Tree, O, Christmas Tree,
    Your branches green delight us!

    O Tannenbaum, o Tannenbaum,
    Du kannst mir sehr gefallen!
    Wie oft hat schon zur Winterszeit
    Ein Baum von dir mich hoch erfreut!
    O Tannenbaum, o Tannenbaum,
    Du kannst mir sehr gefallen!


    O Christmas Tree, O Christmas Tree,
    You give us so much pleasure!
    How oft in wintertime the sight,
    O tree of fir, gives us delight!
    O Christmas Tree, O Christmas Tree,
    You give us so much pleasure!
  • Hymns: 55, 57, 235 (with Chalice Lights and Singers on bells)

December 24 5pm Christmas Eve Service for Children & Families

  • Prelude: O Sanctissima with bells played by Chalice Singers
    Sanctus from the Requiem of Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924)
    (People are invited to place the candles they brought with them in the center alter as the Prelude is played).
  • Ringing of the Bell
  • Call to Worship
    Responsive Reading: 616
  • Singing: 253 O Come All Ye Faithful
    O Come, All Ye Faithful was written by John Francis Wade in 1743, and originally had four Latin verses. English and Portuguese verses were added in the 1800s, and are apropriate both for Christmas and Epiphany services.
  • Welcome
  • Anthem with Children's Choirs: Riu riu chiu (Spanish Renaissance villancico)
    This sixteenth-century villancico is preserved in a large manuscript from 1556 in Uppsala, Sweden, but scholars now believe it to have been composed by Mateo Flecha (El Viejo). The choral refrain imitates the sound of a nightingale (Riu, riu chiu) and develops the metaphor of  a river bank protecting it, “as God kept the wolf from our lamb.” The first solo compares the purity of Mary to a lamb protected from harm. The second solo describes how only one born so humbly (as Jesus) could bring atonement. The final solo is the most poetic: “A thousand singing herons/ I saw passing/ Flying overhead, sounding/ A thousand voices exulting,/ ‘Glory be in the heavens and peace on earth/ for Jesus has been born.”
    Click here to hear a recording of this selection by Amici Cantores
    Riu, riu chiu, la guarda ribera,
    Dios guardo el lobo de nuestra cordera.
    He who herds by the river:
    God kept the wolf far away from our ewe.

    1. Este qu’es nascido es el gran monarca,
    Cristo patriarca de carne vestido;
    Hanos redimido con se hazer chiquito,
    aunqu’era infinito, finito se hizera. Riu, riu...
    1. The newborn child is the mightiest monarch,
    Christ patriarchal invested with flesh.
    He made himself tiny and so redeemed us:
    he who was infinite became finite. Riu, riu...
    2. Muchas profecias lo han profetizado,
    y aun en nuestros dias lo hemos alcancado.
    A Dios humanado vemos en el suelo
    y al hombre nel cielo porqu’er le quisiera. Riu, riu...
    2. Many a prophecy told of his coming,
    and now in our days have we seen them fulfilled.
    God became man, on earth we behold him,
    and see man in heaven because he so willed. Riu, riu...
  • Reading from Charlotte’s Web by E. B. Whilte
  • Singing: 241 In the Bleak Midwinter
    In the Bleak Midwinter sets a beautiful Christmas poem by Christina Rosetti in the early 1870s on the subject of the incarnation of Jesus. Our hymnal reprints Gustav Holst’s (1874-1934) famous setiing of the poem, which he composed while directing the music program at Morley College, London. He dedicated this piece to his former schoolmate, Ralph Vaughan Williams, himself a prolific hymn composer.
  • Reading
  • Anthem with Children's Choirs: Velvet Shoes by Randall Thompson (1899-1984)
    Randall Thompson attended Harvard University and received a doctorate in music from the University of Rochester School of Music. He went on to teach at the Curtis Institute, at Wellesley, and at Harvard, where Leonard Bernstein was one of his students. Velvet Shoes is a delicate depiction of the stillness of winter. As we listen to this poem, our senses are arrested by whiteness, silence, suspended motion, and softness. Poet Eleanor Wylie's snow symbolizes tranquility: the lace and silk, the milk, dews, silence, peace, and velvet are all warm and comforting. Snow is often used in Zen poetry to suggest the true nature of the world when finally perceived by the enlightened awareness. Everything is seen as one, the same, radiant, “white” – objects may not be passively disappearing, but actively hiding themselves.
  • Reading
  • Singing: 244 It Came Upon a Midnight Clear
    It Came Upon the Midnight Clear is a poem and hymn tune written by Edmund Sears, pastor of the Unitarian Church in Weston, Massachusetts at the request of his friend W. P. Lunt, a minister in Quincy, Massachusetts. This unusual carol, emphasizing the necessity of bringing peace during this season, was first printed in Boston in 1849.
  • Special Offertory for Renewal House a shelter for victims of domestic violence
  • Homily: Let Christmas Come by John N. Marsh
  • Singing: 245 Joy to the World
    Joy to the World was written by the early Massachusetts composers and music educators Isaac Watts and Lowell Mason. Part of the tune was derived from an orchestral opening in Handel’s Messiah (for the recitative Comfort Ye), and several choral movements in The Messiah begin with the same descending figure.
  • Prayer: Carlton E. Smith
  • Sharing of the Light (candle lighting instructions given)
  • Singing: 251 Silent Night (hum melody after final verse with candles raised)
    Silent Night (Stille Nacht in the original German),  was composed by the Austrian headmaster Franz Xaver Gruber to lyrics by the German priest Father Joseph Mohr in the 1700s. This song was sung simultaneously in German and English by troops during the Christmas truce of 1914, as it was one of the few carols that soldiers on both sides of the fron tline knew.
  • Benediction: words of Howard Thurman
  • Resume singing Silent Night 252, ushers will dismiss congregants row by row.

December 24 7:30pm Evening Christmas Eve Service

  • Prelude: Sonata in G Major for two winds and continuo, BWV 1039 (1720) by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
    Mies Boet-Whitaker, flute; Carl Schlaikjer, oboe; Sarah Haera Tocco, organ
  • What Sweeter Music by John Rutter (1945-, English)
    Betty-Jean Reuters Ward, Daniel Reuters, Ward, Jean Renard Ward
    Carl Schlaikjer, Iris Tanner, Laura and Michael Prichard with Sarah Haera Tocco, organ

    Ave Regina Caelorum by Guillaume Dufay (c1397-1474, Franco-Flemish)
    Jean Renard Ward, Laura and Michael Prichard

  • Final Prelude Music: Sanctus from the Requiem of Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924, French)
    First Parish Choir with Sarah Haera Tocco, pianist
    (People are invited to place the candles they brought with them in the center alter as the Prelude is played)
  • Ringing of the Bell & Call to Worship
  • Responsive Reading: 616
  • Singing: 253 O Come All Ye Faithful
  • Anthem: Gabriel's Message (The Angel Gabriel from Heaven Came)
    Text and organ recording at: http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/t/t071.html
    Video version by Sting (2006): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GF2BzUDeTkY
    This carol is based on a Basque one, Birjina gaztettobat zegoen, collected by Charles Bordes and published in the series Archives de la tradition basque, 1895. The Rev. Sabine Baring-Gould, who wrote several novels and hymns (including Onward, Christian Soldiers) and who had spent a winter as a boy in Basque lands, translated the carol into English, reducing the original 6 stanzas to 4 and giving Gabriel the very beautiful and very Victorian "wings as drifted snow." It quotes the biblical account of Mary's Annunciation (Luke I. 26-38) and Mary's Magnificat (Luke 1.46-55).
  • Reading: Luke 2: 1-7
  • Singing: 241 In the Bleak Midwinter
  • Reading: Luke 2: 8-16
  • Singing: 231 Angels We Have Heard On High
    Angels We Have Heard on High is based on the words of a traditional French Christmas carol Les Anges dans nos Campagnes (literally, The Angels in Our Countryside). Its most common English version was translated in 1862 by James Chadwick.
  • Reading: Matthew 2:1-12
  • Anthem: Come to the Manger by Peter McCann (text by Orrin Hatch)
    Michael Prichard and Laurie Francis-Wright, soloists
    An article on the lyricist: http://www.ardmoreite.com/stories/050797/news/news11.html
  • Reading: Matthew 2:13-23
  • Singing: 244 It Came Upon a Midnight Clear
  • Special Offertory for Renewal House a shelter for victims of domestic violence
  • Homily: "Let Christmas Come" by John N. Marsh
  • Singing: Hallelujah from G. F. Handel's Messiah
    Video link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQdlBqQAQ1A
    Click here to hear a recording
    Sound practice files http://cyberbass.com/Major_Works/Handel_GF/Handel_Messiah.htm ----- Song #44
    Online Sheet Music http://www.cpdl.org/wiki/index.php/Hallelujah_Chorus_%28from_Messiah%29_%28George_Frederic_Handel%29
  • Prayer: Carlton E. Smith & Sharing of the Light (instructions given)
  • Singing: 251 Silent Night (hum melody after final verse with candles raised)
  • Benediction: words of Howard Thurman
  • Resume singing Silent Night, ushers will dismiss congregants row by row.

December 30
Carlton E. Smith "Promises to Keep"

  • Hymns & Readings: 131, 323, 474, This is a Promise

January 6
Rev. Carlton E. Smith and Anne Goodwin "Getting Organized"

  • Prelude: Cornet Voluntary in D Minor by John Stanley (1712-1786)
  • Candle Music: The Farthest Field by David Dodson arranged by Diane Taraz Shriver
    First Parish UUlations, directed by Jennifer Kobayashi
  • Offertory: Allegro from Toccata in E Minor by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
  • Anthem: Let's Begin Again by John Rutter (1945-)
  • Postlude: Throw It Away by Abbey Lincoln
    Anne Goodwin and Jim Austin
  • Hymns & Readings: 16, 350, 414, 512, The Quiltmaker's Gift

January 13
Guest Speaker: Rev. John Buehrens "Why the Stork Stands on One Leg"

  • Prelude: Sonntag (Sunday) by Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
  • Candle Music: Sacred Space by Rafael Scarfullery, guitar faculty at Lynchburg & Sweet Briar Colleges (VA)
    See his website for a full biography and list of other rewards: http://www.rafaelscarfullery.com/biography.html
    Text by Diane Taraz Shriver, winner of the 2007 First Parish Arlington Hymn Competition
  • Offertory: Andante con moto from Sonata No. 13 "Appassionata" by Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
  • Anthem: Call to Remembrance by Richard Farrant (c1530-1580)
  • Postlude: Prelude and Fugue in A Minor by J. S. Bach (1685-1750)
  • Hymns & Readings: 114, 187, 276, 414, 644

January 20
Rev. John Marsh "When Martin Luther King Jr. Spoke About God"

  • Organ Prelude: Gradual by Edouard Batiste
    Choral Prelude: Beati quorum via, op. 38, no. 3 by Sir Charles Villiers Stanford (1852-1924)
    The Newton Choral Society's website has notes and a recording: http://www.newtonchoral.org/listen.html
  • Candle Music: A Winter Prayer by Fenno Follensbea Heath, Jr. (1926-)
  • Offertory: Andante cantabile from Sonata no. 3 in F Major by Dmitri Kabalevsky
  • Anthem: Precious Lord by Thomas Dorsey
    Caryn Sandrew, alto; Jim Austin, piano
  • Postlude: Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child
    Caryn Sandrew, alto; Jim Austin, piano
  • Hymns & Readings: 111, 149, 169, 414, 584

January 27 - Mozart's Birthday
Rev. John Marsh "The Great Public Education Conspiracy"

  • Prelude: Quintet for Winds and Piano, Largo by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
  • Offertory: Quintet for Winds and Piano, Allegretto by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
  • Anthem: Os justi meditabitur (1879) by Anton Bruckner (1824-1896)
    Notes: http://members.macconnect.com/users/j/jimbob/classical/bruckner_motets.html
    See this website for a practice file: http://wso.williams.edu/cpdl/sound/bruckner/bruc-005.mid
    See this website for a video of the Cologne Boys' Choir: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8no8t0saHI
    Text & translation (Psalm 37: 30-31):
    Os justi meditabitur sapientiam,
    The mouth of the righteous utters wisdom,
    et lingua ejus loquetur judicium. and his tongue speaks what is just.
    Lex Dei ejus in corde ipsius: The law of his God is in his heart;
    et non supplantabuntur gressus ejus. and his feet do not falter.
    Alleluia. Rejoice.
  • Hymns & Readings: 40, 55, 124, 414, Once Upon a Time, Excerpt from the writings of Lee Barker

February 3 A Sermon in Dialogue
Rev. John Marsh and Carlton E. Smith "What the Bible Told Me"
Felix Mendelssohn's 199th Birthday

  • Prelude: Lift Thine Eyes from Elijah by Felix Mendelssohn
    Ladies of the Adult Choir
  • Offertory: Scherzo from Mendelssohn's incidental music for A Midsummer Night's Dream
    Flute Quartet: Mies Boet-Whitaker, Alison Lacasse, Ted Live and Stephanie Franzosa
  • Anthem: Cast Thy Burden Upon the Lord from Elijah by Mendelssohn
  • Hymns & Readings: 77, 414, 1036, 1038, What My Grandmother Told Me

February 3 Piano Recital, 3:30pm
Sarah Haera Tocco, pianist

  • Toccata in E Minor, BWV 914 by J. S. Bach (1685-1750)
  • Sonata No. 3 in F Major, op. 46 by Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
  • Sonata in F Minor, op. 57, "Appassionata" by Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
  • Moments musicaux, op. 16, nos. 3-6 by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943)

February 9
Farewell Dinner for Carlton E. Smith

February 10
Carlton E. Smith "Once Upon a Time"

  • Prelude: The Glory of Love
    Chalice Singers Children's Choir
  • Candle Music: Indaba: We Believe in You by Ysaye Barnwell for Sweet Honey in the Rock
    UUlations and Rev. Carlton Elliott Smith
  • Anthem: Dirait-on from the Rilke Flower Songs by Morten Lauridsen
    Click here to hear a recording of this selection by the CalTech Women's Glee Club (SSA version)
    Click here to hear a recording of this selection by FVHS (SATB version)
  • Postlude: Bridges by Sergio Mendes and Kevyn Lettau
    First Parish Jazz Ensemble: Caryn Sandrew, vocals; Jim Austin, piano; Scott Samenfeld, bass; Alex Ptacek-Zimmer, congas
  • Hymns & Readings: 347, 442, Blue Boat Home, Why We Tell Stories

February 16 Chalice Singers Field Trip to Yale University
Attended Out of the Blue Jam & Graduate French Horn recital by MM candidate Rebecca Miller

February 17
Rev. John Marsh "On Doing What Needs to be Done"

  • Prelude: Velvet Shoes by Randall Thompson (1899-1984)
    Chalice Singers and Sopranos/Altos of the First Parish Choir
  • Candle Music: Stopping by Woods by Randall Thompson (1899-1984)
  • Offertory: Moments musicaux no. 3 in E Minor by Sergei Rachmaninoff
  • Anthem: One Voice by the Wailin' Jennys
    Diane Shriver, solo, with the Women of the Adult Choir
  • Postlude: Prelude in G Minor of Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
  • Hymns & Readings: 89, 126, 299, 414, Frog and Toad in Winter by Arnold Lobel

February 24
Rev. John Marsh "Racing and Dancing"

  • Candle Music: Mélodie by Arthur Foote
    Carl Schlaikjer, oboe
  • Offertory: Aubade Villageoisie by Arthur Foote
    Carl Schlaikjer, oboe
  • Postlude: Symphony No. 18, II. by Sammartini
  • Hymns & Readings: 94, 203, 208, 414

March 2
Rev. John Marsh "Reading as a Spiritual Discipline"

  • Prelude: Prelude by Louis-Antoine Dornel
  • Offertory/Anthem: Alto Rhapsody, op. 53 by Johannes Brahms
    Dorothy May, alto, with the Men of the Adult Choir
  • Postlude: Grand Jeu – Gayement by Louis-Antoine Dornel
  • Hymns & Readings: 158, 295, 350, 414, The Paperbag Princess by Robert Munch

March 9
Rev. John Marsh "Comedy and Tragedy"

  • Prelude: Prelude by Wilbur Held
  • Candle Music: Ninye Otpushchenie by Sergei Rachmaninoff
  • Offertory: Prelude in D Major, op. 23, no. 4 by Rachmaninoff
  • Anthem: Thou Canst Not Buy Me Love by Paul McCartney and John Lennon
  • Postlude: Toccatina by Held
  • Hymns & Readings: 17, 128, 414, 1000, Did You Milk My Cow?

March 9 Memorial Service for Parish Manager Butch Redding
Rev. John Marsh & Rev. Carlton E. Smith

  • Prelude: Meditation by William Wolstenholme
  • Music: Fragrance by Frank Bridge
    Kenneth Seitz, piano
  • Anthem: We Remember Them by Ben Steinberg (UU Hymnal Reading #720)
  • Postlude: Swimming to the Other Side by Pam Humphries
  • Hymns & Readings: 100, 108, Camas Lilies by Lynn Ungar, In Betweenness by Richard S. Gilbert

March 16 Palm Sunday and Annual Peeps Show
Guest Speaker: Caitlyn O'Brien "Resilience of the Activist"

  • Prelude: Vocalise by Sergei Rachmaninoff
    Wendy Page, clarinet solo, with the First Parish Symphonic Band
  • Chalice Lighting Anthem with bells: Serenity (1919) by Charles Ives
    Chalice Singers
    Text: O, Sabbath rest of Galilee!
    O, calm of hills above,
    Where Jesus knelt to share with Thee,
    the silence of eternity
    Interpreted by love.
    Drop Thy still dews of quietness,
    till all our strivings cease:
    Take from our souls the strain and stress,
    and let our ordered lives confess,
    the beauty of thy peace.
    by John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892),
    The Brewing of Soma, from The Pennsylvania Pilgrim, and Other Poems, published 1872
  • Culmination of Stewardship Campaign: Diane Shriver, guitar
  • Candle Music: Agnus Dei by Samuel Barber
    Click here to hear a live recording of the piece by the Willamette University Chamber Choir
    Click here to hear a live recording of the original string orchestra version of the piece by Modern Strings
  • Offertory: First Arabesque by Claude Debussy
  • Song for the Center of the Sermon: Excerpt from Everything's Alright from JC Superstar
  • Postlude: Prelude in F Major by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
  • Hymns & Readings: 21, 414, The Palm Carpet, The Frenzy of the Activist by Sir Thomas Merton
  • Peeps Show follows the service

March 21 Good Friday Service at 6pm
Rev. John Marsh

  • Prelude and Musical Interludes 1 and 3: Miserere mei by Gregorio Allegri for double chorus
  • Musical Interlude 2: Medieval English Ballad Duet (based on the Stabat mater chant)
    Heather and Jennifer Kobayashi, sopranos
  • Hymns & Readings: 265, Mark 15

March 23 8am Early Easter Communion Service
Rev. John Marsh - service adapted from Hymns of the Spirit (Red Hymnal), published jointly by the Unitarian Association and the Universalist Church of America (1937)

  • Prelude: Trumpet Voluntary by Henry Purcell
  • Introit: Introit by Marguerite Shaw with text by R. F. Leavens
  • Candle Music: Rise Up My Love by Healey Willan
  • Offertory: Festival Procession by Richard Strauss
  • Bread & Juice Communion: Alleluia (1940) by Randall Thompson (1899-1984)
  • Postlude: Sortie by Nicholas Jacques Lemmens
  • Hymns & Readings: 406, 1048, Matthew 5: 3-11, 38-41, 6:1-6, 28-33; Mark 2:23-27; Luke 10: 25-37; John 8:1-11

March 23 10am Traditional Intergenerational Easter Service
Rev. John Marsh "Harry Potter and the Great Code"

  • Prelude: Rhapsody from A Little Night Music by Stephen Sondheim
    First Parish Jazz Orchestra
  • Chalice Lighting Anthem with bells: Serenity (1919) by Charles Ives
    Chalice Singers
    Text: O, Sabbath rest of Galilee!
    O, calm of hills above,
    Where Jesus knelt to share with Thee,
    the silence of eternity
    Interpreted by love.
    Drop Thy still dews of quietness,
    till all our strivings cease:
    Take from our souls the strain and stress,
    and let our ordered lives confess,
    the beauty of thy peace.
    by John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892),
    The Brewing of Soma, from The Pennsylvania Pilgrim, and Other Poems, published 1872
  • Introit: Introit by Marguerite Shaw with text by R. F. Leavens
  • Offertory: Festival Procession by Richard Strauss
  • Postlude/Recessional for Egg Hunt: Overture from Guillaume Tell by Giacchino Rossini
    Intergenerational Family Orchestra
  • Hymns & Readings: 269, 270, Old Hundredth, What Would Jesus Say? by Alla Renee Bozarth

March 30
Youth-led Service with music coordinated by the RE Committee

April 6 Shinn Service & First Parish Musicale at 2pm
Sam Williams, COO, UU Urban Ministry "From Powerlessness to Priviledge"

  • Prelude: April Showers by Silver & DeSylva
    Chalice Singers Children's Choir: Marianne, Will, Samantha, and Nami, soloists
  • Candle Music: Pavane by Henry Purcell
  • Offertory: Dreams by Andrew Pereli, poetry by Lanston Hughes
    A new work for mixed choir, string quartet and wind quartet.
  • Anthem: Be the Change by Corey Smith
    Diane Shriver, guitar
  • Postlude: Piano Solo by Claude Debussy
  • Hymns & Readings: 348, 414, 457, 537, Swimming to the Other Side by Pat Humphries, I Can Make a Difference by Marion Wright Edelman

April 6 First Parish Musicale at 2pm

  • UUlations: I Love to Rhyme & Mr. Sandman
  • Flute Duet: Billy's Waltz by Kate Cuzner
  • Diane Taraz, dulcimer and vocals: Les Filles du Roi & Bring Me a Boat
  • Pereli/Whitford Duet: I Know That It's a Wonderful World by James Morrison
  • Drew Pereli, piano: The Girl with the Flaxen Hair by Claude Debussy
    Gavotte from French Suite No. 5 by J. S. Bach
  • Laurie Francis-Wright & John Yannis: Love and Happiness by Mark Knopfler & Emmylou Harris, Peace Like a River arr. by Elizabeth Mitchell
  • Andrew Leonard & Dorothy May: The Song that Goes like This by John du Prez & Eric Idle from Spamalot
  • Intergenerational Musical: The Music Man by Meredith Willson

April 13 Spring Music Service: Copland and his Contemporaries
Laura Stanfield Prichard, Director of Music

  • Prelude: Work for Harp by Carlos Salzedo
    Virginia Crumb, harp
  • Intergenerational Music: The first five days of creation from In the Beginning (1947) by Aaron Copland (1900-1990)
    Cindy Vredevelt, soprano solo
  • Candle Music: Quiet City by (1939) Aaron Copland (1900-1990)
    Carl Schlaikjer, English horn; Brad Amidon, trumpet
  • Offertory: Nocturne for Piano, op. 33 (Homage to John Field) by Samuel Barber (1910-1981)
    Kenneth Seitz, piano
  • Anthem: The completion of the creation from In the Beginning (1947) by Aaron Copland (1900-1990)
    Cindy Vredevelt, soprano solo
  • Musical Reflection: Work for Harp by Carlos Salzedo
    Virginia Crumb, harp
  • Postlude: The Promise of Living (1952-54) from The Tender Land by Aaron Copland (1900-1990)
  • Hymns & Readings: 16, 21, 60, 298, 360, 414, Assignment #1: Write a poem about Baseball and God by Philip Burnham

April 20
Rev. John Marsh "Dayenu, or, Playing the Hand We are Dealt"

  • Prelude: Hear Ye, Israel from Elijah by Felix Mendelssohn
  • Candle Music: Adagio from A Fugal Concerto by Gustav Holst
    Mies Boet-Whitaker, flute; Carl Schlaikjer, oboe
  • Offertory: Moderato from A Fugal Concerto by Gustav Holst
    Mies Boet-Whitaker, flute; Carl Schlaikjer, oboe
  • Anthem: Thou Shalt Bring Them In from Messiah by Geroge Frederic Handel
    Dorothy May, alto
  • Postlude: When Israel Was in Egypt's Land (African American spiritual)
    Lorraine Cooley, piano
  • Hymns & Readings: 151, 220, 414, Dayenu

April 27 Women's Alliance Service
Women's Chorus led by Cheri Minton

  • Anthem: The Garden Song
  • Anthem: The Anti-Garden Song

May 4
Rev. John Marsh "All in the Same Boat - Universalism Today"

  • Prelude: Now Is the Month of Maying by Thomas Morley
    Click here to hear an under-tempo but fun recording by the amateur German choir Canterino
  • Candle Music: Recorder Consort
  • Offertory: Mille Regretz Recorder Consort
  • Anthem: Ce moys de May by Clement Janequin (c1485-1558)
    Click here to see the score for this selection
    Click here to hear the parts played for this selection
    Click here to hear a live recording of this selection
  • Postlude: O Lusty May Recorder Consort
  • Hymns & Readings: 142, 159, 190, 414, 704

May 11 Mother's Day Service (7am Peace March)
Rev. John Marsh "Honoring Motherhood"

  • Prelude: April Showers by Silver & DeSylva
    Robert, Will, Marianne, Alison and Nami, soloists
    Count Your Blessings by Irving Berlin
    Glory of Love by Billy Shunn
  • Dedication Ceremony: Sailing Down My Golden River by Pete Seeger
    Diane Taraz Shriver, guitar
  • Candle Music: In My Room by Brian Wilson
    Click here to read Brian Panfile's brilliant essay on this tune
    Click here for the German lyrics (Ganz allein)
    Click here
  • Offertory: Prelude in F-sharp Minor by Chopin
  • Anthem: Sincere by Meredith Willson
  • Postlude: Toccata by Dietrich Buxtehude
  • Hymns & Readings: 34 (sung before children are dismissed), 191, 357

May 17 Fundraising Concert by the Mystic Chorale

May 18
Rev. John Marsh & Tina Schultz "What's Next"

  • Prelude: Fugue by Louis-Antoine Dornel
  • Candle Music: Golá by Riccardo Yehoshua ben Avraham Moretti
    Carl Schlaikjer, oboe; Sarah Haera Tocco, piano
  • Offertory: Moments musicaux no. 2 by Sergei Rachmaninoff
  • Anthem: Halla lalla layya (Arabic friendship song from Lebanon)
  • Postlude: Grand Jeu – Gayement by Louis-Antoine Dornel
  • Hymns & Readings: 44, 301, 325, 414, All on a Sunday Morning by Cindy Kallet

May 25 Memorial Day Weekend - Adult Choir Service Trip
UU Society of Vineyard Haven, Martha's Vineyard, MA
Carol Loud, Music Director
Ken Beebe, speaker

  • Preludes: O Lusty May English Renaissance madrigal
    Now is the Month of Maying by Thomas Morley (c1557-1602)
    Ce Moys de May by Clement Janequin (c1485-1558)
    Sung by the First Parish UU Church of Arlington Choir, Laura Prichard, director
    Andy & Jennifer Kobayashi, Barbara Allen, and Ted Live, recorder quartet
  • Musical Interlude: Sailing Down My Golden River by Pete Seeger
    Led and arranged by Diane Taraz Shriver
  • Offertory: Sacred Space by Rafael Scarfullery
  • Postlude: In May, that Lusty Season
    Sung by the UUlations, Jennifer Kobayashi, director
  • Hymns & Readings: 26, 34, 611, 684, 685, Desiderata by Max Ehrmann

May 25 Concert for a Cause II: First Parish Choir & the U.S. Slave Song Project
Union Chapel, Oak Bluffs, Martha's Vineyard

  • Golà & Shir Kuzari by Riccardo Moretti
    Carl Schlaikjer, oboe; Sarah Haera Tocco, piano
  • Dirait-on from the Les Chansons des Roses (1993) by Morten Lauridsen (1943-)
    Click here to hear a recording of this selection by the CalTech Women's Glee Club (SSA version)
    Click here to hear a recording of this selection by FVHS (SATB version)
    Comments by the composer: "In addition to his vast output of German poetry, Rainer Maria Rilke (1875-1926) composed nearly 400 poems in French. His poems on roses struck me as especially charming, filled with gorgeous lyricism, deftly crafted and elegant in their imagery. These exquisite poems are primarily light, joyous and playful, and the musical settings are designed to enhance these characteristics and capture the delicate beauty and sensuousness of the poetry. Distinct melodic and harmonic materials recur throughout the cycle, especially between Rilke's poignant "Contre Qui, Rose" (set as a wistful nocturne) and his moving "La Rose Complète." The final piece, "Dirait-On," is composed as a tuneful chanson populaire, or folksong, that weaves together two melodic ideas first heard in fragmentary form in preceding movements.
    Les Chansons des Roses was premiered and recorded in 1994 by Portland, Oregon's celebrated chamber choir Choral Cross-Ties, conducted by Bruce Browne. The complete cycle has been widely performed since then and has also been recorded by the Los Angeles Master Chorale, Los Angeles Chamber Singers, Nordic Chamber Choir, and the Donald Brinegar Singers."
  • Ce Moys de May by Clement Janequin (c1485-1558)
    Andy & Jennifer Kobayashi, Barbara Allen, and Ted Live, recorder quartet
  • Sailing Down My Golden River by Pete Seeger
    Led and arranged by Diane Taraz Shriver
  • In My Room by Brian Wilson
  • Los Bilbilicos (Greek Sephardic folksong in Ladino) arranged by Laura Prichard
    Heather & Jennifer Kobayashi, sopranos; Carl Schlaikjer, oboe
    After their expulsion from Spain in 1492, Jews brought their culture and language around the Mediterranean, including to the Balkan areas controlled by Turkey (the Ottoman Empire showing more religious tolerance).
    Bilbilicos are nightingales, a typical Judeo-Spanish mixture of a host language (in this case, "Bilbil") and the Spanish diminutive, "icos", yielding Bilbilicos. There is a distinction between Ladino and Judeo-Spanish, but it is not well observed these days. Ladino is essentially a word-for-word translation, or "calque," from Hebrew into Castillian as it was spoken in the fifteenth century on the Iberian peninsula. Traditional Ladino was written in Hebrew script. The everyday spoken and written language was known as Judezmo (influenced by Greek and Turkish), Spaniolit (in the ex-Ottoman areas), Khaketia (in Northern Africa), and many other variations.
    Text/Translation:
    Los bilbilicos cantan / the nightingales sing
    En los arbos de la flor / in the flowering trees
    Mi neshama mi ventura / my soul and my fate
    Estan en tu poder / are in your power

    La rosa enflorese / the rose blooms
    En el mes de mai / in the month of May
    Mi neshama s'escurese, / my soul darkens,
    Firendose el lunar / as the moon is obscured/eclipsed

    Mas presto ven palomba / hurry dove
    Mas presto ven con mi / hurry to me
    Mas presto ven querida, / hurry beloved
    Corre y salvame / run and save me

June 1 Founder's Day
"Sacred Spaces" Rev. John Marsh with Rev. Caitlyn O'Brien

  • Prelude: Melodie by Stephen Heller
  • RE Classes Procession: Enter, Rejoice and Come In
  • Candle Music: Morning Meditation by Ben Logan
  • Offertory: Shir Kuzari by Riccardo Moretti
    Carl Schlaikjer, oboe; Sarah Haera Tocco, piano
  • Anthem: Beati quorum via by Sir Charles Villiers Stanford (1852-1924)
    In his time, the Irishman Stanford was possibly the most distinguished composer of English church music; his influence upon English musical life was enormous and long-lasting. Like Parry, he taught many students who were later to become significant composers and disseminated a Teutonic idiom, gleaned from his studies in Leipzig and Kiel in the mid 1870s. Having been appointed Professor of Music in 1883 at the new Royal College of Music, Stanford was elected Professor of Music at Cambridge University in 1887.
    Stanford was, like many composers of his generation, gifted in writing musical miniatures. Victorian England had a huge appetite for ‘drawing-room music’ and so there was much demand from composers to publish material for that market. Stanford was also at ease with the larger forms; his works include nine operas, seven symphonies, ten concertos, six “Irish Rhapsodies”, four Masses, twenty-two secular cantatas, eight string quartets, six organ sonatas, and so on. His experience with these larger musical structures evidently taught him terseness in his smaller works. His choral music has survived when much of the work of his contemporaries has not. The renewed interest in him as a composer should allow his works to survive as one of the highest achievements in Victorian and Edwardian music.
  • Postlude: Sacred Space by Rafael Scarfullery
  • Hymns & Readings: 113, 133, 288, 414, Remember the House by Doris E. Abramson

June 8 Flower Communion & Coming of Age Credos

  • Candle Music: Dirait-on from the Les Chansons des Roses (1993) by Morten Lauridsen (1943)
    Click here to hear a recording of this selection by the CalTech Women's Glee Club (SSA version)
    Click here to hear a recording of this selection by FVHS (SATB version)
    Comments by the composer: "In addition to his vast output of German poetry, Rainer Maria Rilke (1875-1926) composed nearly 400 poems in French. His poems on roses struck me as especially charming, filled with gorgeous lyricism, deftly crafted and elegant in their imagery. These exquisite poems are primarily light, joyous and playful, and the musical settings are designed to enhance these characteristics and capture the delicate beauty and sensuousness of the poetry. Distinct melodic and harmonic materials recur throughout the cycle, especially between Rilke's poignant "Contre Qui, Rose" (set as a wistful nocturne) and his moving "La Rose Complète." The final piece, "Dirait-On," is composed as a tuneful chanson populaire, or folksong, that weaves together two melodic ideas first heard in fragmentary form in preceding movements.
    Les Chansons des Roses was premiered and recorded in 1994 by Portland, Oregon's celebrated chamber choir Choral Cross-Ties, conducted by Bruce Browne. The complete cycle has been widely performed since then and has also been recorded by the Los Angeles Master Chorale, Los Angeles Chamber Singers, Nordic Chamber Choir, and the Donald Brinegar Singers."
  • Anthem: Erev Shel Shoshanim with poetry by Moshe Dor

June 15
"Father's Day" - Rev. John Marsh
Musicians - David Whitford and Hannah Mathes, violin; Bob Voges, guitar; Laura Prichard, piano

June 22
"Celebration of Summer" - Lori Kenschaft
Musician - Jim Austin, piano

June 29
"UU Perspectives on the Presidential Election" - Sue Sheffler, Bill Hamilton, and Jim Hall
Musician - Jim Austin, piano

July 6
"Reflections on Buddhist Meditation Practice" - Donna Sharff
Musician - Jim Austin, piano

July 13
"How Non-Violence Changed the World in My Lifetime: USA, South Africa, Poland" - Carolyn Stevens and David Landskov

  • Prelude: Serenades 1-4, KV 439b by Wolfgang A. Mozart (1756-1791)
    Mies Boet-Whitaker, flute; Carl Schlaikjer, oboe; Jean Renard Ward, bassoon
  • Candle Music: Adagio from Trio Sonata No. 1 in C by Johann S. Bach (1685-1750)
  • Offertory: Shaker Medley performed by Nancy McDowell, soprano
  • Anthem: When You Believe by Stephen Schwartz
    Iris Tanner, soprano
  • Postlude: Moderato from Sonata No. 3 by Giovanni B. Pergolesi
  • Hymns & Readings: 109, 117, 122, 562, A Force More Powerful, excerpts by Marshall Rosenberg

July 20
"The Day After Tomorrow" - Jonathan Markowitz Bijur and Rebecca Benefiel Bijur

  • Candle Music: From a Distance by Julie Gold
    Alan Schweitzer, guitar
  • Offertory: Hymn to the Russian Earth by Yuri Zaritsky and Eugene Friesen
    If the people lived their lives
    As if it were a song for singing out of light
    Providing music for the stars
    To be dancing circles in the night.
  • Offertory: (Ours is) A Simple Faith by Mustard's Retreat
  • A Prayer for the Future
    A prayer for community (blue candle)
    One: We remember the centuries of history of this church community.
    Many: Let us pray with love and hope for the future of this community.
    A prayer for children (red candle)
    One: Let us create a world in which the children of the present and the children yet to be born can grow to be safe, strong, and wise.
    Many: Let us pray with love and hope for future generations.
    A prayer for the earth (green candle)
    One: Let us work now and forever to sustain the beauty of nature and our own place within it.
    Many: Let us pray with love and hope for the future of the earth.
    A prayer for peace (white candle)
    One: Among the eternal struggles of thought against thought, neighbor against neighbor, nation against nation, we build peace in the world and share peace in our lives.
    Many: Let us pray with love and hope for peace in all times and places.
    A prayer for the day after tomorrow (orange candle)
    One: We are blessed with the opportunity to look to the future with clear eyes,m to acknowledge our past and our present actions and to plan for and expect a brighter future. May we always share that blessing.
    Many: Let us pray with love and hope for the day after tomorrow.
  • Anthem: Alleluia, The Great Storm is Over by Bob Franke ©1982 Telephone Pole Music Publishing Co. (BMI)
    1. The thunder and lightning gave voice to the night;
    the little lame child cried aloud in her fright. .
    "Hush, little baby, a story I'll tell,
    of a love that has vanquished the powers of hell.
    Chorus: Alleluia, the great storm is over, lift up your wings and fly!
    Alleluia, the great storm is over, lift up your wings and fly!
    2. Sweetness in the air, and justice on the wind,
    laughter in the house where the mourners had been.
    The deaf shall have music, the blind have new eyes,
    the standards of death taken down by surprise. Chorus
    3. Release for the captives, an end to the wars,
    new streams in the desert, new hope for the poor.
    The little lame children will dance as they sing,
    and play with the bears and the lions in spring. Chorus
    4. Hush little baby, let go of your fear:
    the Lord loves his own, and your mother is here."
    The child fell asleep as the lantern did burn.
    The mother sang on 'till her Bridegroom's return." Chorus
  • Postlude: Imagine by John Lennon
  • Hymns & Readings: 1, 360, 661, 1059, excerpt from Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth by R. Buckminster Fuller, The Day After Tomorrow

July 27
"Creating a Culture of Peace: the Hidden Roots of War and Injustice" - the Rev. Will Tuttle
Musician - William Tuttle, piano soloist; Jean Monroe, hymns

August 3
"The Spirit of Water" - Christina Sillari
Musicians - Prichards

  • Prelude: Afton Water (Scottish Folk Tune) arranged by Sir David Willcocks (1919-)
    Flow gently, sweet Afton, among thy green braes!
    Flow gently, I'll sing thee a song in thy praise!
    My Mary's asleep by thy murmuring stream,
    Flow gently, sweet Afton, disturb not her dream.

    Thou stock-dove, whose echo resounds thro' the glen,
    Ye wild whistling blackbirds in yon thorny den,
    Thou green-crested lapwing, thy screaming forbear,
    I charge you disturb not my slumbering fair.

    How lofty, sweet Afton, thy neighbouring hills,
    Far mark'd with the courses of clear winding rills;
    There daily I wander as noon rises high,
    My flocks and my Mary's sweet cot in my eye.

    How pleasant thy banks and green valleys below,
    Where wild in the woodlands the primroses blow;
    There oft, as mild Ev'ning sweeps over the lea,
    The sweet-scented birk [birch] shades my Mary and me.

    Thy crystal stream, Afton, how lovely it glides,
    And winds by the cot where my Mary resides,
    How wanton thy waters her snowy feet lave,
    As gathering sweet flowrets she stems thy clear wave.

    Flow gently, sweet Afton, among thy green braes [hills],
    Flow gently, sweet river, the theme of my lays;
    My Mary's asleep by thy murmuring stream,
    Flow gently, sweet Afton, disturb not her dream.
    - by Robert Burns (1759-1796)
  • Candle Music: Sicut cervus by Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina
  • Offertory: The Blue Bird by Sir Charles V. Stanford (1852–1924)
    Stanford was the son of Irish musicians and made his name in England as an improvisatory organist. He was a professor at both the Royal College of Music and at Cambridge University for over forty years, and was the main composition teacher of Edward Elgar, Gustav Holst, and Ralph Vaughan Williams. In The Blue Bird, Stanford uses a soprano solo to represent the female poet's voice. The choral parts mirror each other, symbolizing the bird's reflection on the surface of a calm lake. The altos sustain long pitches throughout the piece, representing the surface of the water and its ability to transform our perceptions of "real" images and their reflections (an opposite viewpoint, or a necessary balance?).
    Text by Mary Coleridge (1861-1907) -
    The lake lay blue below the hill,
    O'er it, as I looked, there flew
    Across the waters, cold and still,
    A bird whose wings were palest blue.
    The sky above was blue at last,
    The sky beneath me blue in blue,
    A moment, ere the bird had passed,
    It caught his image as he flew.
  • Postlude: To Be Sung on the Water, op. 42, no.2 (1969) by Samuel Barber (1910-1981)
    Click here to hear all parts played
    Click here for an article of the poet Louise Bogan and the text of the poem
    Notes: Samuel Barber's music represents the confluence of twentieth-century tonal harmonies and nineteenth-century structures. Both a pianist and a baritone of some repute, Barber is principally known as a composer of songs and of music for piano. His vocal lines always respond to the contours and meaning of the text, and his choral compositions show influences of British Romanticism and in particular the a cappella choral output of Elgar, Stanford, and Parry. The part-song To be sung on the water is a restrained, lyrical setting of a Louise Bogan poem. At one point, Barber intended to insert this song into Antony and Cleopatra, his final opera, but ultimately decided against it; however, he had enough affection for the piece that he asked that it be performed at his funeral. Heard in every bar of the piece, a slow, lapping motive comprising two sixteenth notes followed by a quarter note suggests the paddling of oars. Against this rhythm appears a long, lyrical outpouring, first given to the sopranos and altos and then to the tenors and basses. Instead of building to a climax, we are given a slow, quiet coda which "like an echo" recedes into the eternal quiet.

August 10
"Fun as a Spiritual Path" - Emily Randall and Marlene Hobel
Flute Loops Chamber Ensemble, Mies Boet-Whitaker, director

  • Prelude: Kerry Dance
  • Candle Lighting: Londonderry Air
  • Offertory: The Irish Washerwoman

August 17
"On Gardens and Relationships: from Carolina to the Banks of the Volga" - Cheri Minton
Music organized by Cheri Minton

August 24
"Regret Reduction" - Christine Rafal
David Whitford and Hannah Mathes, violin; Bob Voges, guitar; Rachel and Eva-Leah Stark; Jean Monroe, hymns (possible)

August 31
"Forgiveness in the Age of Climate Change" - Glenn Koenig
Nancy McDowell, soprano; Bill Geha, piano

 

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