History of the Music Program: 2008-2009

First Parish Unitarian Universalist of Arlington

 

2008-2009
Director of Music: Laura Stanfield Prichard
Organist/Pianist: Sarah Haera Tocco

September 7 Water Communion

  • Prelude: Sous le dôme epais from Lakmé by Léo Delibes (1836-1891)
    Laura Prichard and Dorothy May, vocal duet; Sarah Haera Tocco, piano
  • Candle Music: Hotaru koi, a Japanese Traditional Water Round
    First Parish UUlations, Jennifer Kobayashi, director
    Notes: Hotaru koi is a traditional Japanese round. The rhythmic interplay of the piece is supposed to remind one of fireflies on the water.
    Translation: Ho, ho, hotaru koi! (Come, firefly, come!)
    Atchi, no mizu, w, nigai zo; (Over there the water is bitter;)
    Kotchi no mizu wa mai zo, (Over here the water is sweet,)
    Ho, ho, hotaru koi. (Come, firefly, come.)
  • Offertory: By a Meadow Brook from Woodland Sketches, op. 51 by Edward MacDowell (1860-1908)
    Sarah Haera Tocco, piano solo
  • Anthem: The Blue Bird by Sir Charles V. Stanford (1852–1924)
    Notes:
    Stanford was the son of Irish musicians and made his name in England as an improvisatory organist. He was a professor at both the Royal College of Music and at Cambridge University for over forty years, and was the main composition teacher of Edward Elgar, Gustav Holst, and Ralph Vaughan Williams. In The Blue Bird, Stanford uses a soprano solo to represent the female poet's voice. The choral parts mirror each other, symbolizing the bird's reflection on the surface of a calm lake. The altos sustain long pitches throughout the piece, representing the surface of the water and its ability to transform our perceptions of "real" images and their reflections (an opposite viewpoint, or a necessary balance?).
    Poem by Mary Coleridge (1861-1907) -
    The lake lay blue below the hill,
    O'er it, as I looked, there flew
    Across the waters, cold and still,
    A bird whose wings were palest blue.
    The sky above was blue at last,
    The sky beneath me blue in blue,
    A moment, ere the bird had passed,
    It caught his image as he flew.
  • Water Communion Music: Down in the River to Pray from the Coen Brothers' film, based on Homer's Odyssey, Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?
  • Postlude: Bridge Over Troubled Water by Paul Simon (1941-)
    Improvisation by Sarah Haera Tocco
  • Hymns & Readings: 210, 358
  • Quotation: There is nothing softer and weaker than water, And yet there is nothing better for attacking hard and strong things. For this reason there is no substitute for it. All the world knows the weak overcomes the strong and the soft overcomes the hard. -- Lao-Tzu (fl. B.C. 600)

Sunday, September 7
3pm Benefit Concert for the UUA Knoxville Relief Fund
John Buehrens, Former President of the UUA, Guest Speaker

  • Professional and amateur musicians from Arlington, Belmont, Boston, Cambridge, Carlisle, Medford, Newton, Somerville, Winchester, and Westborough, MA gathered to raise more than $1500 for the UUA's Knoxville Relief Fund.
  • Jazz Prelude:Chris Botos, trombone/leader; Daniel Van Leeuwen, baritone saxophone; Scott Samenfeld, bass; Jom Austin, piano; Alex Zimmer, drums; Caryn Sandrew, vocal
    Softly As in a Morning Sunrise by Romberg/Hammerstein, arr. Samenfeld
    Doxy by Theodore Walter "Sonny" Rollins (1930-)
    Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child (spiritual), arr. Austin
  • Welcome: the Rev. John Marsh
  • Fantasia in G Major, BWV 572 by J. S. Bach (1685-1750)
    Beautiful Life for piano by Natsumi Malloy
    Natsumi Malloy, Organist/Pianist, First UU Society of Middleborough
  • Candle Lighting Music:
    Erbarme dich (St. Matthew Passion, BWV 244) by J. S. Bach (1685-1750)
    Presto in E minor, op. 16, no. 4 by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943)
    Dorothy May, alto; Mies Boet-Whitaker; Sarah Haera Tocco, piano
  • Choral Anthems: You are the New Day by John David (of the British band Airwaves, 1978), arranged by Peter Knight
    Avinu Malkeinu from the Kol Nidre (Yom Kippur) Service by Max Janowski
    Like a Mighty Stream by Moses Hogan
    Combined choir of singers from 12 local communities and congregations
    Mike Prichard, cantor; Laura Prichard, Dir. of Music, F. Parish Arlington
    Alfa Radford, pianist, Mus. Dir., First Church in Belmont, UU
  • Andante and Allegro Moderato from Sonate in fis-moll by Harald Genzmer
    Mies Boet-Whitaker and Willemein Insinger, flutes
  • Amaryllis by Diane Taraz
    The Name is Changeless by Gwyneth Wlaker (1947-)
    The Farthest Field by David Dodson, arr. by Diane Taraz
    Over the Rainbow by Harold Arlen (1905-1986)
    UUlations; directed by Jennifer Kobayashi, First Parish Arlington
  • Pavane by Maurice Ravel (1875-1937)
    Peace
    by Horace Silver (1928-)
    John Kramer, Music Director, Winchester Unitarian Society
  • Keynote Speaker & Offering: the Rev. John Buehrens
  • Peace by Horace Silver (1928-), arr. by Scott Samenfeld
    First Parish Arlington Jazz Combo
  • Professional and amateur musicians from Arlington, Belmont, Boston, Cambridge, Carlisle, Medford, Newton, Somerville, Winchester, and Westborough, MA gathered to raise $1,600 for the UUA's Knoxville Relief Fund.

Saturday, September 13 Blood Drive

Sunday, September 14
Rev. John Marsh: "Building Trust"

  • Prelude: Toccata in F Major by Dieterich Buxtehude (1637-1707)
  • Candle Music: Silver the Moon by Diane Taraz Shriver
  • Offertory: Aubade Villageoise by Arthur Foote (1853-1937)
    Carl Schlaikjer, oboe; Sarah Haera Tocco, piano
  • Anthem: You are the New Day by John David (of the British band Airwaves, 1978), arranged by Peter Knight
    I will love you more than me and more than yesterday,
    if you can but prove to me you are the new day.
    Send the sun in time for dawn,
    let the birds all hail the morning;
    love of life will urge me say,
    "You are the new day."
    When I lay me down at night knowing we must pay,
    thoughts occur that this night might stay yesterday.
    Thoughts that we, as humans small,
    could slow worlds and end it all
    lie around me where they fall, before the new day.
    One more day when time is running out for everyone;
    like a breath I knew would come
    I reach for the new day.
    Hope is my philosophy,
    just needs days in which to be,
    love of life means hope for me
    borne on a new day.
    Notes - Songwriter and record producer John David was born in 1946 in Cardiff, Wales. Having played bass on popular hits with Dave Edmunds in the group Love Sculpture (Sabre Dance, 1969; I Hear You Knocking, 1970; and It's Too Late in 1970 covered by The Searchers), John has had several parallel careers; as a session bass player, solo performer, producer, songwriter and a member of the Rockfield studio band Airwaves which chalked up two Top-100 albums. John has gone on to produce some of the biggest names in rock at his Berry Hill studio, including Robert Plant, the BBC, Cliff Richard, and Little Richard. As a bassist, John has performed with Springsteen, Clapton, Sting, Bryan Adams, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr.
  • Hymns & Readings: 1, 40, 348, 414, Spiritual Chickens by Stephen Dobyns, Snowbanks North of the House by Robert Bly

Saturday, September 20 Arlington Town Day

Sunday, September 21 (Vernal Equinox is Sept. 22)
Rev. John Marsh: "Building Trust, part II
"

  • Prelude: AHS Senior Leah Eva Cirker-Stark, original piano solo
  • Candle Music: Schaffe in mir, Gott, ein rein Herz from Motette, op. 29, no. 2 by Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
    Excerpt from Vivaldi's Concerto in G for Two Mandolins
    Jean Renard Ward, Daniel Reuters Ward, and Bob Olsen, string trio
  • Offertory: Daniel Reuters-Ward, guitar solo
  • Anthem: Tröste mich wieder from Motette, op. 29, no. 2 by Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
  • Postlude: Cello Suite by Johann S. Bach
    Drew Pereli, cello solo
  • Hymns & Readings: 414

Saturday, September 27 United First Parish Church (Unitarian) Quincy, MA, 7:30pm
Benefit Event for "The Church of the Presidents" featuring John Quincy Adams

  • Flute Loops Chamber Trio playing traditional Irish dances
  • Choral Music by William Billings from Colonial Massachusetts

Sunday, September 28 1st Jewish Music Service & Tocco Piano Recital
Guest Musician, Virginia Crumb, harp
Rev. John Marsh: "Rosh Hashanah"

  • Prelude, Offertory, Postlude: Sonatine by Sergiu Natra (1924-)
    Virginia Crumb, harp
    Sergiu Natra (email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) was born in Rumania in 1924 and was educated at the Music Academy of Bucharest. He started to compose in Rumania and there attained his first successes winning the George Enescu Prize in 1945 and the Rumanian State Prize in 1951. Natra came to Israel in 1961 and continued to work intensively both as a composer and as a teacher of composition. He is the recipient of many prizes including the prestigious Prime Minister's Award. Natra wrote orchestral works (among them the"Sinfonia" for strings, "Toccata", "Voices of Fire"); vocal works including the "Song of Deborah", the cantata ''Ness Amim" and the "Sacred Service"; as well as chamber and instrumental music. His works for the harp have attained international popularity among leading harpists the world over, in particular his "Sonatina", "Prayer", "Divertimento", and "Music" for violin and harp are widely performed.
    Of his work the composer says: "... I have tried to synthesize the specific elements of my last compositions; that is to strive to be entirely free from any constraints in form and to be true to my deep interest in the neo-baroque as well as polytonal and polymodal harmonies. One could ask: 'Is this looking back or is it exploring the future?' Clearly the manner of using chords on the harp and sonorities that sound well with string instruments - and I do not refer to consonance versus dissonance - influenced my writing. Is this not, perhaps, just the way we have found our direction in the entire development of music over the last twenty years?"
  • Sounding of the Shofar: Tekiya
    Dorothy May, shofar & Andee Rubin, cantor
  • Candle Music: Adonai roi from Chichester Psalms (1965) by Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990)
    Robert Harrelson, treble solo, with the Ladies of the Choir
    Click here to hear a practice files for this selection.
    Click here to read the wikipedia article for this selection.
    Translation: David's Psalm (23):
    Adonai roi, lo ekhsar. (The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want.)
    Bin'ot deshe yarbitseini, al mei m'nukhot y'nakhaleini. (I lie in green pastures, I am led to still waters.)
    Naf'shi y'shovev, yan'heini b'ma'aglei tsedek. (He restores my soul, he leads me in the right path.)
    L'ma'an sh'mo. (For the same of His name.)
    Ladies: Gam ki eilech b'gei tsalmavet, (Though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death,)
    Lo ira ra, ki Atah imadi. (I will fear no evil, for you are with me.)
    Shiv't'kha umishan'tekha hemah y'nakhamuni. (Your rod and staff comfort me.)
  • Anthem: Adonai, lo gavah libi (Lord, my heart is not haughty, Psalm 131/133) from Leonard Bernstein's Chichester Psalms
    Translation: Psalm of Reflection (131)
    Adonai, lo gavah libi (Lord, my heart is not haughty)
    V'lo ramu einai, v'lo hilachti (nor my eyes lofty, nor do I trouble myself)
    Big'dolot uv'niflaot mimeni. (with great matters too wonderful for me to understand.)
    Im lo shiviti v'domam'ti, (Surely I have calmed and quieted myself)
    Naf'shi k'gamul alei imo, alai naf'shi. (My soul is like a child weaned of his mother.)
    Yakhel Yis'rael el Adonai me'atah v'ad olam. (Let Israel hope in the Lord forever.)
    Psalm of Community (133)
    Hineh ma tov, umah nayim, (Behold how good and pleasant it is)
    Shevet akhim gam hachad. (For brethren to dwell together as one.)
  • Hymns & Readings: 21, 159, 414

Sunday, September 28 Sarah Haera Tocco Piano Recital
Celebration the Restoration of the Steinway grand

  • Preludes by Rachmaninoff
    op.3, no. 2 in C sharp Minor
    op.23, no. 4 in D Major, no. 5 in G Minor, no. 6 in E flat Major
    op.32, no. 12 in G sharp Minor
  • Ballades op.38, no. 2 in F Major; op. 47, no. 3 by Chopin
  • Scherzo op. 20, no. 1 in B minor by Chopin
  • Performer Bio: After a debut at New York Carnegie Weill Recital Hall as an accompanist in 1985, Sarah Tocco has had a very busy and demanding concert career both as a soloist and as an accompanist. As a graduate of the Manhattan School of Music in New York where she earned both BM and MM degrees in Piano Performance, Ms. Tocco has appeared in numerous concerts in Jamaica, Vietnam, Brazill, and major cities throughout the United States including New York, Los Angeles, New Orleans, and Portsmouth. Her recently produced CD of the music of Chopin, Brahms, and Schubert is becoming a music lover's favorite. Once praised by the New York Times as "a very sensitive pianist," Ms. Tocco continues to demonstrate her deep, expressive interpretation of Romantic music on stage. Ms. Tocco is currently working with four different choral groups: the Broad Cove Choral, Unicorn Singers, Sharing a New Song, and Boston College High Choir which involve international concert tours, along with her frequent solo and chamber recitals. She resides in Newton and has an active private teaching studio.

September 29 - October 1 Rosh Hashanah

Saturday, October 4 Cantilena Yard Sale

Sunday, October 5
Second Jewish Music Service (Ferry Beach Weekend)
Rev. John Marsh: "What's Next (Yom Kippur)"

  • Prelude: Prelude in C sharp Minor, Op. 3, No. 2 by Sergei Rachmaninoff
  • Intergenerational Sharing Music: Walk in Jerusalem, Just Like John
  • Candle Music: Mi Shebeirach by Debbie Friedman
    Jewish tradition ordains that whenever the Torah is read we are granted a special and uniquely opportune moment to invoke blessing for those in need of divine intervention. From time immemorial it has therefore been the custom to recite a Mi Shebeirach (prayer for the sick) on behalf of people who are ill.
    Mi shebeirach avoteinu  (The one who has blessed our fathers)
    M 'kor habracha l'imoteinu.  (Source of blessing for our mothers.)
    May the source of strength who blessed the ones before us,
    Help us find the courage to make our lives a blessing, and let us say, Amen.
    Mi shebeirach imoteinu  (The one who has blessed our mothers)
    M 'kor habracha l'avoteinu.  (Source of the blessing for our fathers)
    Bless those in need of healing with r'fuah sh'leimah.  (complete healing)
    The renewal of body, the renewal of spirit, and let us say, Amen.
  • Offertory: Ballade No. 2 in F Major, op. 38 by Frédéric Chopin
  • Anthem: Avinu malkeinu from the Sacred Service by Max Janowski (1912-1991)
    Michael Prichard, baritone
    Translation - Hear our voice, O father, pity and be compassionate to us, and accept, with compassion and favour, our prayers. Traditional prayer for Yom Kippur
    Notes - Max Janowski was born in Berlin, Germany. He was a prodigious 20th-century composer, conductor, and organist whose liturgical compositions have been performed in concert halls, synagogues, churches and colleges throughout the world. He emigrated to Japan and then to New York in 1937. He was the beloved music director, organist, and choir director at six Chicago-area synagogues and Unitarian congregations
  • Postlude: Prelude in G Minor, op. 23, no. 5 by Rachmaninoff
  • Hymns & Readings: 53, 144, 414

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October 12
Guest Speaker: Rev. Jean L. Wahlstrom, May Memorial, Syracuse, NY "Fighting Terrorism since 1492"

  • This sermon is a Columbus Day reflection on home lands, Homeland Security, and the War on Terrorism. Rev. Wahlstrom is a life-long Unitarian Universalist, currently serving the May Memorial UU Society in Syracuse, New York.
  • Prelude: Adagio from Trio Sonata in C Major, BWV 1037 by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)
    Mies Boet-Whitaker, flute; Carl Schlaikjer, oboe; Sarah Haera Tocco, piano
  • Candle Music: American Shaker Songs
    Nancy McDowell, soprano
  • Offertory: Alla breve from Trio Sonata in C Major, BWV 1037 by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)
  • Anthem: Creation (1794) by William Billings (1746-1800)
  • Postlude: Badinage by Victor Herbert (1859-1924) arr. by Rudolf Schramm (1903-1981)
  • Hymns & Readings: 21, 159, 342, 414, 496

October 19
Rev. Charles Grady: "We Are the Saints"

  • Our Minister Emeritus, the Rev. Charles Grady, and wife Claudine will be with us for approximately a week in October. In order to be faithful to our liberal way in religion, the past, the present, and the future must come together in the here and now. I am convinced that the challenge today is as great as it was in the daunting period from 1975, when we surveyed a heap of rubble and found reason to go on. Looking back is easy, for we know how it turned out. Looking ahead is more risky.
  • Prelude: When the Saints Go Marchin' In, arr. by Paul Edwards
    Woodwind Sextet
  • Candle Music: Silent Devotion and Response from Ernest Bloch's Avodath Hakodesh (Sacred Service, 1933)
    This third movement of Bloch's Sacred Service starts with a meditation. The orchestra/organ alone is heard, allowing the listeners a moment to formulate their own thoughts in silent prayer. Then the choir, a cappella, quietly intones Yihyu Lerotson, the prayer for acceptance. The composer called this section "a silent meditation which comes in before you take your soul out and look at what it contains." The most important part of any Jewish prayer is the introspection it provides, the moment that we spend looking inside ourselves, seeing our role in the universe.
    Translation - O Lord, may the words of my mouth and the meditations of my heart
    be acceptable before Thee, Adonoi, my Rock and Redeemer. Amen (So be it).
    [Side thought on the word Adonai] - Adonai comes from the root word "Adon," which means lord. A king would be referred to as Lord, or actually any person of high status. In modern Israel, Adon is used as "mister", as in Adon Bloch = Mr. Bloch. A related word, Adoni (pronounced adonee), means "my lord," and is used as a form of respect. Adonai means Lord in the divine sense (as in this prayer): this is what confused the gospel writers, who didn't know Hebrew, and thus didn't know that Jesus was being referred to as Adoni, because he was a teacher.
  • Offertory: Chromatic Fantasy by Johann S. Bach
  • Anthem: Sacred Space by Rafael Scarfulery to text by Diane Taraz Shriver
  • Postlude: Fantasia in C Major by Johann S. Bach
    Sarah Haera Tocco, organ solo
  • Hymns & Readings: 52, 103, 112, 414

October 25 Fall Family Hallowe'en Party and Musicale, 2pm

  • Pumpkin Carols
  • Ruddigore, or, the Witch's Curse by Gilbert & Sullivan

October 26 Intergenerational Hallowe'en Service
"In Remembrance of Autumn"
Led by Krista Ernewein and shaped by the RE Committe
e

  • Prelude: Fanfare by Mouret
    First Parish Wind Ensemble
  • Candle Music: Adagio from Mozart's Wind Quintet
  • Offertory: Apple Tree Wassail
    UUlations
  • Postlude: Elfin Dance for Flute and Clarinet Quartet by Edvard Grieg
  • Hymns & Readings: 51, 316, 391, 414, 436, 455, 706, Honoring the Four Directions, Pumpkin Carols: If You're a Ghost and You Know It, Jack-O-Lantern, Pumpkin Bells
  • Benediction in song - Typically we do a Wiccan blessing at the end of
    our circles, "The Circle is open but unbroken, may the peace of the
    Goddess go ever in your hearts, merry meet, merry part and merry meet
    again."

Sunday, November 2 [Daylight Savings Time]
Rev. John Marsh: "Looking Homeward from Afar [Jerusalem]"

  • Prelude: Lento Espressivo by Marin Marais
  • Candle Music: In Te, Domine, Speravi from Lux Aeterna (1997) by Morten Lauridsen (1943)
  • Offertory/Anthem: Agnus Dei from Lux Aeterna (1997) by Morten Lauridsen (1943-)
  • Postlude: Processional in G Major by John Stanley
  • Notes by Peter Rutenburg: "In his preface to the published choral score, Morten Lauridsen wrote, "Lux Aeterna was composed for and is dedicated to the Los Angeles Master Chorale and its superb conductor, Paul Salamunovich, who gave the world premiere in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion of the Los Angeles Music Center on April 13, 1997. The work is in five movements played without pause. Its texts are drawn from sacred Latin sources, each containing references to Light. The piece opens and closes with the beginning and ending of the Requiem Mass, with the three central movements drawn, respectively, from the Te Deum (including a line from the Beatus Vir), O Nata Lux and Veni, Sancte Spiritus.
    "The instrumental introduction to the Introitus softly recalls motivic fragments from two pieces especially close to my heart (my settings of Rilke's Contre Qui, Rose and O Magnum Mysterium) which recur throughout the work in various forms. Several new themes in the Introitus are then introduced by the chorus, including an extended canon on et lux perpetua. In Te, Domine, Speravi contains, among other musical elements, the cantus firmus Herliebster Jesu (from the Nuremburg Songbook, 1677) and a lengthy inverted canon on fiat misericordia. O Nata Lux and Veni, Sancte Spiritus are paired songs -- the former the central a cappella motet and the latter a spirited, jubilant canticle. A quiet setting of the Agnus Dei precedes the final Lux Aeterna, which reprises the opening section of the Introitus and concludes with a joyful Alleluia."
    Since its premiere, Lauridsen's Lux Aeterna has had dozens of performances around the country and abroad, in both the orchestral and organ versions. In addition, a 1998 Grammy nomination for the Master Chorale's recording of the work (RCM 19705) brought widespread acclaim. It is possible to hear in Lux Aeterna the echoes of a direct line back thirteen centuries to the codification of plainchant by Pope Gregory; to the first and second Notre Dame schools under Leonin and Perotin respectively; to the paired dialogues that distinguish
    Josquin's high Renaissance style; to the playfulness of early Baroque counterpoint; to cantus firmus (chant or hymn melodies in long notes) as a Palestrina or Bach might have used them; to the sonorities heard in Brahms' Requiem, and beyond to the 21st century. Indeed Lauridsen's choice of ancient texts and the associations that come with them add an important component to this two-way bridge to the past and future. It is the coup of his genius that not only doesn't the music sound academic or labored, but fresh and new, as in a modern distillation of essential flavors. The connections with chant are especially important in Lux Aeterna, so that, like Duruflé, the asymmetric rhythm of the melodies seem to be suspended in time, even as the music is propelled by its inner pulse.
    The power, relevance and finesse of Lux Aeterna speaks to us each in our own language. This with our full attention and assent does it transport us over gossamer paths to a state of enlightenment and grace."
  • Hymns & Readings: 68, 122, 165, 414

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Saturday, November 8 Blood Drive

  • UUlations performed their full hour set: Preview of their Sunday, Dec. 14 Concert in Cambridge

Sunday, November 9 Sunday Service & Arlington Philharmonic Concert
"Beyond Categorical Thinking" (welcoming diversity)
Guest speakers and Ministerial Search Committee Update

  • Candles Music: Melodie by Stephen Heller
  • Offertory: The Word and The Scarf from The Laramie Project by the Tectonic Theatre Company, based on interviews with residents from Laramie, WY following the murder of Matthew Shepard
    Presented by director Michael Byrne and members of the AHS Drama Guild
  • Anthem: Psalm 23 (for my mother) by Bobby McFerrin
    From the light of days remembered burns a beacon bright and clear,
    Guiding hands and hearts and spirits into faith set free from fear.
    When the fire of commitment sets our mind and soul ablaze,
    When our hunger and our passion meet to call us on our way,
    When we live with deep assurance of the flame that burns within,
    Then our promise finds fulfillment and our future can begin.
    —words by Mary Katherine Morn and Jason Shelton
  • Postlude: Ballade by Sarah Haera Tocco, original piano solo
  • Hymns & Readings: 34, 110, 144, 323, 414

Friday, November 14
"Echoes of the Danube: Italian, English, and German Music for Solo Viol"
Music for Viols and Friends, Carol Lewis, viola da gamba
First Church in Cambridge, Congregational

Sunday, November 16
& Duo Atlantica Recital (Mies Boet-Whitaker & Willemein Insinger)
Rev. John Marsh: "A Potluck Theology"
Music Coordinated and arranged by Andrew Leonard, 3rd Annual A Cappella Day

  • Prelude: Java Jive by Ben Oakland (1907-1979) and Milton Drake, arr. Ed Lojeski
    Click here to hear a recording of this selection
  • New Member Recognition Anthem: Lechol Ish Yesh Shem: Each of Us Has a Name by Zelda Mishkovsky (Israei poet, 1914-1984)
  • Candle Music: Pineapple Rag by Scott Joplin (1867-1917)
  • Offertory: Corn Dogs by Richard "Bob" Greene of The Bobs, arr. Andrew Leonard
  • Anthem: Taco Bell Canon by Johann Pachelbel (1653-1706), words and arr. by Do Masi
  • Postlude: Rice Krispies Jingle by Jeffrey and Nelson B. Winkless, Jr.
  • Hymns & Readings: 209, 407, 414, “How to Eat Like a Child” by Delia Ephron

Friday-Saturday, Nov. 21-22 Harvest Moon Fair in Sanctuary

Sunday, November 23
Rev. John Marsh: "Pilgrim Journeys"

  • Prelude: As We Gather Around the Table by Mark Blankenship
  • Intergenerational Song: Turkeys United
  • Candle Music & Anthem: Benjamin Britten's Hymn to St. Cecilia
    Click here for notes on this work
    Click here to practice
  • Offertory: Clarinet Concerto, I. (1948) by Aaron Copland (1900-1990)
    Michelle Markus, clarinet
    Click here for the wikipedia article on the piece.
  • Postlude: Fantasia in C Major by J. S. Bach (1685-1750)
  • Hymns & Readings: 149, 290, 349, 414, The Mayflower Compact

Sunday, November 30
Rev. John Marsh: "The Battle for Christmas" featuring the UUlations, Jennifer Kobayashi, director

  • Prelude: Improvisation by pianist Jim Austin
  • Candle Music: Veni, veni, Emanuel (Anon) - the Thirteenth century predecessor to the Veni Emanuel Gregorian hymn, led by Jennifer Kobayashi
  • Offertory: Shaker Holiday Songs including Welcome Here
    selected and sung by Nancy McDowell
  • Anthem: Star of Glory by Jay Althouse
  • Postlude: Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas by Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane arranged by Russ Robinson
  • Hymns & Readings: 224, 225, 226, 414 and The Loudest Voice by Joyce Paley

Sunday, December 7 "Divisions and Civilizations"
Rev. John Marsh and Victor Carpenter, co-sermon

  • Prelude: Aria in F Major by G. F. Handel
  • Chalice Singers Anthem: Halla lalla layya (Arabic friendship song from Lebanon)
  • Candle Music: A Winter Prayer by Fenno Follensbea Heath, Jr. (1926-2008)
    The Lord Came down on a snowy day.
    White, O, white He lay.
    In spring, the Lord walked all around.
    Stirred seed, spread sod o'er leaf and ground.
    Fell with the rain and rose again.
    Green root, green shoot, oh green he strode.
    So kneel I by thy branches in the snow.
    Let all my branches down and pray to know
    That from each bough so barren now
    A shoot of grace, a sprig of faith will grow.
    by Alexander Winston
  • Anthem: Yerushalayem shel Zahav (Jerusalem of Gold) by Naomi Sherer (1930-2004), based on the Basque lullaby Pello Joxepe
  • Postlude: Concerto in C Major: Allegro by Giuseppe Meck, arr. by J. G. Walther
  • Hymns & Readings: 160, 188, 411, 414, All of These People by Michael Longley

Monday, December 8 Alliance Party

  • Introduction: UUlations
  • Chalice Singers: How the Grinch Stole Christmas
  • UUlations: Lo, How a Rose (canon) by Melchior Vulpius (c1560-1615), arranged by Jennifer Kobayashi
    Bring a Torch, Jeanette, Isabella (French carol) arranged by Clifton J. Noble Jr. (1961-), staff accompanist for Smith College
  • 2008 Alliance Party Dramatic scene: How the Grinch Stole Christmas
    Chalice Singers present music from the 1996 film
    Click here to view "You're a Mean One, Mr. Grinch"
    Click here to listen to a 3-part version of "Fa-who fores, welcome Christmas"

Sunday, December 14 Music Service & Arlington Philharmonic Concert
Guest Musician, Virginia Crumb, harp
"Music for Pacifists" by Laura Prichard

  • Instrumental Prelude: Carol of the BellsVocal Prelude with harp:
  • Choral Prelude with Harp: Introit and Wolcum Yole by Benjamin Britten with Ginger Crumb, harp
  • Instrumental Intergenerational Music: Sleigh Ride by Leroy Anderson
  • Candle Music with Harp: In Freezing Winter Night, That Yonge Child, and Balulalow by Benjamin Britten
    Jennifer Kobayashi, Diane Shriver, Heather Kobayashi, Laura Prichard, solos
  • Offertory: Allegro ma non troppo from Dvorak's American Quartet in F Major
    Natasha and Katrina Rosenberg, violins, Mary Rab, viola, Olivia Munson, bass
  •  

     

  • Anthem: Deo Gracias, There is No Rose, and This Little Babe from Ceremony of Carols (1944) by Benjamin Britten
    SSA practice files: http://cyberbass.com/Major_Works/Britten_B/britten_ceremony_carols_ssa.htm
    http://cyberbass.com/Major_Works/Britten_B/britten_ceremony_carols_satb.htm
    http://cyberbass.com/Major_Works/Poulenc_F/poulenc_gloria.htm
  • Anthem: Hymn to St. Cecilia (1944) by Benjamin Britten
  • Postlude: Sarah Haera Tocco, piano solo
  • Hymns & Readings: 122, 144, 159, 399, 414, 574, 578, 586, 602

Sunday, December 21 Hannukah Celebration
Rev. John Marsh: "Hannukah Intergenerational Service"

  • Prelude: Un poco adagio by C. F. Schale
  • Candle Music: Velvet Shoes (1927) by Randall Thompson (1899-1984)
    Sung by the First Parish Choir Women and the Chalice Singers
    Click here to practice this selection with the melody emphasized
    Randall Thompson was an American composer. He attended Harvard University, became assistant professor of music and choir director at Wellesley College, and received a doctorate in music from the University of Rochester School of Music. He went on to teach at the Curtis Institute of Music, at the University of Virginia, and at Harvard, where Leonard Bernstein was one of his students. He is particularly noted for his choral works. His most popular and recognizable choral work is his anthem, Alleluia, commissioned by Serge Koussevitzky for the opening of the Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood.
  • Offertory: Elevation by Leon Boelmann
  • Chalice Singers Play: Lemony Snicket's The Latke Who Couldn't Stop Screaming
  • Anthem: Here in My House There Are Candles Burning Bright
  • Postlude: Allegro di molto by C.P.E. Bach
  • Hymns & Readings: O Hannukah, 221, 414, The Devil’s Trick by Isaac Bashevis Singer

Wednesday, December 24 Christmas Eve, 5pm Service
Guest Musician, Virginia Crumb, har
p

  • 4:30pm Prelude Music:
    Hodie, That Yonge Child, Balulalow, Freezing Winter Night by Benjamin Britten
    Sanctus
    from Fauré Requiem
    Stopping by Woods
    by Randall Thompson with bells
    Ward family guitar playing
  • 5pm Prelude:Velvet Shoes (1927) by Randall Thompson (1899-1984)
    Sung by the First Parish Choir Women and the Chalice Singers
    Click here to practice this selection with the melody emphasized
    Randall Thompson was an American composer. He attended Harvard University, became assistant professor of music and choir director at Wellesley College, and received a doctorate in music from the University of Rochester School of Music. He went on to teach at the Curtis Institute of Music, at the University of Virginia, and at Harvard, where Leonard Bernstein was one of his students. He is particularly noted for his choral works. His most popular and recognizable choral work is his anthem, Alleluia, commissioned by Serge Koussevitzky for the opening of the Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood.
    Notes: The three-stanza text Velvet Shoes by New Jersey poet Elinor Wylie (1885-1928) evokes the beautiful tranquility of a walk in the snow. "Under veils of white lace, we shall walk in velvet shoes: Wherever we go, silence will fall like dews on the white silence below..." Wylie was famous during her life almost as much for her ethereal beauty and personality as for her melodious, sensuous poetry. This poem comes from her first mature poetry collection, Nets to Catch the Wind (1921). As we listen to this poem, our senses are arrested by whiteness, silence, suspended motion, and softness. These sensual ideas fuse together to create a response called synesthesia. Wylie's snow symbolizes tranquility, just as the speaker in Frost's "Stopping by Woods" listens to "the sweep / Of easy wind and downy flake" and observes that "The woods are lovely, dark, and deep." In fact, Frost's scene, with its "frozen lake" nearby, is actually colder, and may suggest a very subtly pervading presence of death. But there is no such sense of winter's coldness in Velvet Shoes. The lace and silk, the milk, dews, silence, peace, and velvet are all tranquil and comforting.
  • Offertory: Esurientes implevit bonis from Bach's Magnificat
    Carol, Mies, Willemien, Bob, and Sarah, performers
  • Anthems: Interlude for Harp, There is no Rose and Deo Gracias from Ceremony of Carols (1944) by Benjamin Britten
    SSA practice files: http://cyberbass.com/Major_Works/Britten_B/britten_ceremony_carols_ssa.htm
    http://cyberbass.com/Major_Works/Britten_B/britten_ceremony_carols_satb.htm

Wednesday, December 24 Christmas Eve, 7pm Service

  • 6:30pm Prelude Music: Winter Prayer by Fenno Heath
    There is no Rose by Benjamin Britten
    Sweet Little Jesus Boy
    (traditional folk solo) sung by Mikhaela Huston
    Velvet Shoes (1927) by Randall Thompson (1899-1984)
  • 7pm Prelude Music: Minuit, Chretiens (O Holy Night, 1947) with guitar, in the original French, words by Placide Cappeau, music by Adolphe-Charles Adam
    Performed by Diane Taraz Shriver
    Cappeau was a wine merchant in a French village who occasionally wrote poetry. His parish priest asked him to write something for Christmas Eve, and while on a business trip to Paris, on the train, he wrote "Minuit, Chretiens." His poem was set to music by the friend of some acqaintances, Adam, whose Giselle had just been a resounding hit. The song was soon translated into many languages, and the English version was written by a Unitarian minister here in the U.S., who particularly liked the anti-slavery lines.
  • Offertory: Pastoral Symphony (No. 13)
  • Anthems: Sanctus from Fauré Requiem
    Stopping by Woods
    by Randall Thompson with bells
  • Congregational Anthem: Hallelujah! by Handel

December 28 Kwanzaa

  • Candle Music: Guitar Duet by Jean Renard Ward and Daniel Reuters-Ward
  • Postlude: Toccata in F Major by Dietrich Buxtehude
  • Hymns & Readings: 147, 210, 414 and Seven Spools of Thread by Angela Shelf Medearis

Sunday, January 4, 2009 "Hopes for the New Year"

  • Prelude: Fantasia for Organ by Johann Pachelbel
  • Candle Music: That Lonesome Road (1981) by James Taylor (1948-) and Don Grolnick (1948-1996)
    This is a contemplative a cappella setting from James Taylor's 1981 album "Dad Loves His Work" about proceeding calmly through times of great change and stress.
  • Offertory: Chromatic Fugue, BWV 903 by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
  • Anthem: Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening (1958-59) by Randall Thompson (1899-1984)
    This is a short Robert Frost poem encouraging quiet contemplation along life's journey. Thomson was commissioned in 1958 to set seven Frost poems to music to celebrate the bicentennial of Amherst, MA.
    Click here to hear Robert Frost read his poem
    Click here to read about the composition and to hear an expressive a cappella recording by the Two-by-Fours (last link on the page).
  • Postlude: Puisque tout passe (Since time is passing, 1943) from the Six Chansons by Paul Hindemith (1895-1963)
    Puisque tout passe,
    faisons la mélodie passagère;
    celle qui nous désaltère 
    aura de nous,
    aura raison.
  • Chantons qui nous
    quitte avec amour et art;
    soyons plus vite
    que le rapide départ. - poem by Rainer Maria Rilke.

    Translation: Since time is passing, let's make melodies to pass the time; that which sustains us, will have meaning. Let us sing that which leaves us with love and art; let us sing faster than it can leave us.

    Hymns & Readings: 58, 124, 350, 414

January 11
Rev. John Marsh: Celebration of Winter

  • Prelude: Praeludium by Johann Pachelbel
  • Candle Music: In the Bleak Midwinter with a new text and setting by Diane Taraz Shriver
  • Offertory: The Snow is Dancing (1908) by Claude Debussy
  • Anthem: Lo, How a Rose E'er Blooming, sung by the UUlations
  • Anthem: Der Leiermann from Schubert's Die Winterreise
    Michael Prichard, baritone
  • Postlude: Walking in the Air from The Snowman by Howard Blake
  • Hymns & Readings: 55, 57, 414, "Frog and Toad in Winter" by Alfred Lobel, "Too Much Snow" by Louis Jenkins, "Snow, Aldo" by Kate Dicamillo, "The Snow Man" by Wallace Stevens
    The Frozen Lake by Adam Deakin
    Upon the frozen lake I stand
    Its snow white coating so awesomely grand.
    Smooth as silk and icy cold,
    It's a special something only nature can mold.

    Upon the frozen lake I drift,
    I truly enjoy winter's best gift.
    Under the ice water runs by
    Reflected black by the darkening sky.

    The sun drifts up on its heavenly rise
    And unmasks water's best disguise.
    Since I was on the ice I fall
    But not a soul will hear my call.

    NOTES ON THE SERVICE: Snow is often used in Zen poetry to suggest the true nature of the world when finally perceived by the enlightened awareness. Everything is seen as one, the same, radiant, "white" -- everything comes to rest in the interpenetrating glow of being. The idea of separation is lost in the light of a fluid continuity. Objects may not be passively disappearing, but actively hiding themselves. American poet Ivan M. Granger compared this to the Zen approach to worship: "recognizing your own bright nature in the midst of the still, bright field of being -- and to let the sense of a separate (selfish) self fade as you gently merge into that radiance of interbeing."

    Worship by Dogen (1200-1253)
    A white heron
    Hiding itself
    In the snowy field,
    Where even the winter grass
    Cannot be seen.

    In The Snow Man, American poet Wallace Stevens works with the Zen concept of emptiness, or at least three of the four Noble Truths: a) life is suffering; b) suffering results from attachment to transient things and ideas; and c) a cessation of suffering is attainable.)

    The Snow Man by Wallace Stevens (1879-1955)
    One must have a mind of winter
    To regard the frost and the boughs
    Of the pine-trees crusted with snow;
    And have been cold a long time
    To behold the junipers shagged with ice,
    The spruces rough in the distant glitter
    Of the January sun; and not to think
    Of any misery in the sound of the wind,
    In the sound of a few leaves,
    Which is the sound of the land
    Full of the same wind
    That is blowing in the same bare place
    For the listener, who listens in the snow,
    And, nothing himself, beholds
    Nothing that is not there and the nothing that is.

January 18 MLK, Jr. Weekend - Spirituals/Jazz

  • Prelude: Chelsea Bridge by Billy Strayhorn
    Caryn Sandrew, vocals; Tina Kambil, saxophone; Chris Botos, trombone; Jim Austin, piano; Scott Samenfeld, bass
  • Candle Music: Wade in the Water, traditional Spiritual
  • Offertory: Come Sunday by Duke Ellington
  • Anthem: A Change is Gonna Come by Sam Cooke
  • Postlude: I Wish I Knew How by Billy Taylor & Dick Dallas
  • Hymns & Readings: 149, 347, 348, 414

January 23 Friday Night Rock Worship
First Parish Youth Group

  • Part I: Music and Reflections
    Slow Cheetah by RHCP
    Emily Gabriels, Ashley Mullen, vocals; Eric Candilore, drums; Misha Berkrot, Ben Matlack, guitars; David Meier, bass
    Reflection on Slow Cheetah: Eric Spargo
    Across the Universe by the Beatles
    Cola Hodges, Eva Cirker-Stark, vocals; Ben Matlack, guitar
    Reflection on Across the Universe: Shayna Linov
    Comfortably Numb by Pink Floyd
    Eva Cirker-Stark, Jonathan Clegg, vocals; Eric Candilore, drums; Paul Fraszosa, Ben Matlack, guitars; Misha Berkrot, rhythm guitar; Lucas Jaffe, bass; Amanda Strominger, piano
    Group Hum led by Eva Cirker-Stark and Cola Hodges
  • Part II: Music and Readings
    Cats in the Cradle
    Eva Cirker-Stark, Cola Hodges, Heather Kobayashi, vocals; Lyda Langford, drums; Misha Berkrot, guitar; Amanda Strominger, bass
    Pirate by Jen Cass
    Natalie Duranceau
    Since I've Been Loving You by Led Zeppelin
    Jonathan Clegg, vocals; Eric Candilore, drums; Ben Matlack, guitar; McCabe Ballman, bass; Amanda Strominger, piano
    Music by Walter de la Mare
    Drew Pereli
    Breathe (2am) by Anna Nalick
    Alana Thurstonm Lyda Langford, vocals; Eva Cirker-Stark, piano
    Search by Langston Hughes
    Elias Estabrook
    I Will Survive by Cake
    Heather Kobayashi; Eric Candilore, drums; Misha Berkrot, Ben Matlack, guitars; David Meier, bass; Matt Davis, bass
    Instrumental Hum by Eva Cirker-Stark and Cola Hodges
  • Part III: Music and Reflections
    Wish You Were Here by Pink Floyd
    Lyda Langford, vocals; Misha Berkrot, Ben Matlack, guitars
    Reflection on Wish You Were Here: Laura Shriver
    Don't Stop Believin' by Journey
    Emily Gabriels, Ashley Mullen, Dora Pereli, Annie Whitford, Anna Glina, vocals; Eric Candilore, drums; Ben Matlack, guitar; McCabe Ballman, bass; Eva Cirker-Stark, piano
    Reflection on Don't Stop Believin': Seneca Spargo
    The General by Dispatch
    Emily Gabriels, Ashley Mullen, Dora Pereli, Annie Whitford, Anna Glina, vocals; Eric Candilore, drums; Misha Berkrot, Ben Matlack, guitars; David Meier, bass
    Reflection on The General: Rose Sawyer Marsh
    Falling Slowly by Once
    Emily Gabriels, Ashley Mullen, Dora Pereli, Annie Whitford, Anna Glina, vocals; Eric Candilore, drums; Misha Berkrot, guitar
  • Closing Words: Heather Kobayashi

January 25 Mozart Service
"Hope for the Community of Earth" by the Rev. Bill Gardiner

  • Prelude: Giovani Lieti from Mozart's Le Nozze di Figaro
    Mies Boet-Whitaker and Willemien Insinger, flutes
  • Caryn Sandrew speaks on the Canvass
  • Candle Music: Excerpts from Mozart's Die Zauberflöte (The Magic Flute) for flute duet
  • Offertory: Excerpts from Mozart's Variations on "Ah, Vous dirai-je, Maman" K. 265
    Sarah Tocco, piano
  • Anthem: Riddle of the Stars by Diane Taraz Shriver (based on Mozart)
  • Postlude: Excerpts from Mozart's Die Zauberflöte (The Magic Flute) for flute duet
  • Hymns & Readings: 163, 203, 346, 414

February 1 Mendelssohn's 200th birthday this week
"Defensive Driving on the Spiritual Highway" by the Rev. John Marsh
An ancient Greek philosopher once characterized the human life journey as a chariot being drawn by two horses--one rational and orderly, and the other completely driven by passion and enthusiasm. Finding this balance is an ongoing process for all of us. This sermon will launch our 2009 Stewardship campaign.

  • Prelude: Andante from Concertpiece No. 2 by Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1836)
    Michelle Marcus, clarinet; Jean Renard Ward, bassoon
  • Candle Music: Liedchen by Mendelssohn
  • Offertory: Presto from Concertpiece No. 2 by Mendelssohn
    Michelle Marcus, clarinet; Jean Renard Ward, bassoon
  • Anthem: Priidite, poklonimsia (Come, Let Us Worship), op. 31, no. 5 by Sergei Rachmaninoff
  • Postlude: Psalm XIX by Marcello
  • Hymns & Readings: 40, 89, 301, 414, 657

February 8
"Good Morning to You, Valentine" a celebration of love in poetry, story and song

  • Prelude: Mazurka, op. 67, no. 3 by Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849)
  • Candle Music: Ca' the Yowes (Scottish Folk Song) arr. by Ralph Vaughan Williams
  • Offertory: Romanze op. 28, no.2 by Robert Schumann
  • Anthem: The Turtle Dove (English Folk Song) arr. by Ralph Vaughan Williams
  • Postlude: If I Loved You from Carousel by Rogers and Hammerstein
    Dorothy May, alto solo
  • Hymns & Readings: 123, 131, 414, Aimless Love by Billy Collins, The Wild Geese by Mary Oliver, Red Roses and Blue Violets, Crazy in Love by Richard Kennedy
  • MUSIC NOTES
    This week we honor Charles Darwin in music. Darwin's 200th birthday (Feb. 12, 1809) is Thursday, as he was born the very same day as Abraham Lincoln. Darwin read theology and developed his love for natural science at Cambridge, where he could often be found reading in the King's College Chapel, listening to the choir practice. One of his last publications discussed the evolution of musical ability through selection. Although Darwin himself was not a musician, his favorite way to relax was to listen to his wife Emma (who had studied with Frédéric Chopin) play while he reclined on a nearby sofa.

    Today's choral music was composed by Ralph Vaughan Williams, great-nephew of Darwin. They were related through their mothers, who were Wedgwoods (and Unitarians). Ralph was taught to read by his grandmother from the same book with which she had instructed her younger brother, Charles Darwin. He was young at the time of the controversies surrounding Darwin’s works, but was aware of them. When he was seven, Ralph asked his mother about The Origin of Species, and she replied, "The Bible tells us that God made the world in six days. Great-uncle Charles thinks it took rather longer. But we needn't worry - it is equally wonderful either way."

    Vaughan Williams read history and music at Cambridge. He mixed composition with conducting, lecturing, and editing the music of Henry Purcell and the English Hymnal. In 1904, Vaughan Williams began to collect and transcribe English folk songs, which were fast becoming extinct due to the increase of literacy and printed music in rural areas. An ardent patriot, Vaughan Williams enlisted in the ambulance corps and served in France from 1914. When the 45-year-old was commissioned for the Royal Garrison Artillery in 1917, his character reference was Darwin's third son, the eminent Cambridge botanist Sir Francis Darwin. Both Charles Darwin and Vaughan Williams are buried in Westminster Abbey.

February 15
Christina Sillari "From OMs to Moans: Exploring How Spiritual Practice Can Lead to Spiritual Action"
 

  • Prelude: Original Composition by Leah Eva Cirker-Stark
  • Candle Music: Allemande from the French Suite No. 2 by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
    Carl Schlaikjer, oboe; Michelle Markus, clarinet; Jean Renard Ward, bassoon
  • Offertory: I Will Survive, sung by Heather Kobayashi and group
  • Anthem: Group Hum, led by the Youth
  • Postlude: Allegro from Cinq Pièces en Trio by Jacques Ibert
  • Hymns & Readings: 121, 298, 347, 414, Hymns played by Bill Geha, excerpt from The Dog and the Heartless King: A Story from India; excerpts from the Bhagavad Gita

 

February 22
"The Free Mind: An Appreciation of William Ellery Channing," dedicated to the memory of Butch Redding by the Rev. John Marsh

  • Candle Music & Anthem: Hymns by Lowell Mason
  • Hymns & Readings: 39, 111, 287, 414, 592

March 1
Rev. John Marsh "Does God Have a Future?"

  • Prelude: Imagine by John Lennon
    Jim Austin, piano solo
  • Candle Music: Adagio from String Trio in G Major by G. F. Handel (1685-1759)
    Hannah Mathes, violin; Kate Roberts, cello; Barbara Tilson, piano
  • Offertory: Étude in E Major, op. 10, no. 3 by Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849)
  • Anthem: God is Seen arr. by Alice Parker
  • Postlude: Ninye Otpushchayushi (Depart in Peace) by Sergei Rachmaninoff
  • Hymns & Readings: 23, 51, 414, 549, excerpts from The Amber Spyglass by Philip Pullman and from At the End of Mechanical Age by Donald Barthelme

March 8
"Music Service & Dedication of the Sanctuary Lights"

  • Prelude: Original Composition by Leah Eva Cirker-Stark
  • Intergenerational Anthem: Choral Fantasy, op. 80 by Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
    Sarah Haera Tocco, piano; Nancy McDowell, Jennifer Kobayshi, Dorothy May, Cheri Minton, Andrew Leonard, Jean Renard Ward, Jonathan Markowitz Bijur, John Stanley, vocal soloists; Adam K. Boyles, Director of the MIT Orchestra, conductor
  • Candle Music: Through the House Give Glimmering Light by Amy Marcy Cheney Beach's (1867-1944)
    UUlations, directed by Jennifer Kobayashi
    Text from Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream Act V scene ii: Oberon and Titania's speech to the fairies:
    Through the house give glimmering light,
    By the dead and drowsy fire,
    Every elf and fairy sprite,
    Hop as light as bird from brier;
    And this ditty, after me,
    Sing and dance it trippingly.
    First rehearse your song by rote:
    To each word a warbling note,
    Hand in hand, with fairy grace,
    Will we sing and bless this place.
  • Offertory: Adagio sostenuto, Sonata No. 13, “Moonlight” by Beethoven
    Kenneth Seitz, piano
  • Anthem: Flute Quartet  by Kenneth Seitz
    Mies Boet-Whitaker, Stephanie Franzosa, Anne Quaadgras, Ted Live
    First Parish Flute Loops Quartet
  • Postlude: When Music Sounds by Jennifer Kobayashi
    UUlations, directed by Jennifer Kobayashi
    Text by Walter de la Mare (1873-1956)
    When music sounds, gone is the earth I know,
    And all her lovely things even lovelier grow;
    Her flowers in vision flame, her forest trees
    Lift burdened branches, stilled with ecstasies.

    When music sounds, out of the water rise
    Naiads whose beauty dims my waking eyes,
    Rapt in strange dreams burns each enchanted face,
    With solemn echoing stirs their dwelling-place.

    When music sounds, all that I was I am
    Ere to this haunt of brooding dust I came;
    And from Time's woods break into distant song
    The swift-winged hours, as I hasten along.
  • Hymns & Readings: 44, 118, 184, 327, 345

March 15 Alliance Service (March 20 Vernal Equinox)
"Forgiveness and Reconciliation"
Facilitators: Tom Salter & Jane Webb

  • Prelude: Prelude, Fantaisie, La Folette by Marin Marais
    Carol Lewis, viola da gamba; Chris Henriksen, theorbo
  • Candle Music: Chanson La Buisson by Antoine Forqueray
  • Offertory: Folies d'Espagne by Robert de Visee
  • Postlude: Rondeau by Marin Marais
  • Hymns & Readings: 414

March 22 Youth Group Service & Latke Party

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March 29 1st Candidating Sunday
Guest vocal group Iveria
"A Matter of Faith" by the Rev. Marta Flanagan

  • Prelude: Chven Mshvidoba
  • Candle Music: Alleluia, a traditional setting for Men's Chorus from Georgia (with men of the choir); Tsmindao Ghmerto
  • Offertory: Romelni Kherubinta, Davidartsa
  • Anthem: Ninye Otpushchayushi (Let They Servant Depart in Peace) by Sergei Rachmaninoff
    Combined Choirs
  • Postlude: Blagoslovi (Blessed Be)
  • Hymns & Readings: 187, 347, 368, 414, 672
    Jim Austin, piano

April 5 Palm Sunday & 2nd Candidating Sunday
"Lessons From the Wilderness" by the Rev. Marta Flanagan

  • Prelude: A Voluntary by William Selby
  • Chalice Singers Intergenerational Story: “Let My People Go” and Where Does “Hosanna” Come From?
  • Candle Music: "There Came a Great Darkness" (The Eclipse) from Israel in Egypt by G. F. Handel (1685-1759)
  • Offertory: “The Exodus” from Israel in Egypt by George F. Handel
    Ted Live and Stephanie Franzosa, flutes
  • Anthem: Largo by Antonio Vivaldi
  • Postlude: Finale on "Jerusalem The Golden" by William Spark
  • Hymns & Readings: 6, 140, 220, 414, 453, 632

April 10 Good Friday Tenebrae Service

  • Prelude: Christ lag in Todesbaden (Choral Prelude) by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)
  • Music for Reflection: Suite for Solo Cello by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)
    Andrew Pereli, cello
  • Hymns & Readings: 265, When Jesus Looked from Olivet, Responsive reading from Ecclesiastes and Mark 15

April 12 Easter 8am Service
Guest Speaker
Pat Bonnet

  • Prelude: Fugue in G Major by J.S. Bach
  • Anthem: Rise Up, My Love (1929) by Healey Willan (1880-1968)
    Click here for a biography of the composer. Rise up my love, my fair one, and come away. For lo, the winter is past, the rain is over and gone; The flowers appear on the earth, the time of the singing of birds is come. Songs of Songs 2: 10-12
  • Postlude: Toccata in F Major by Johann Kaspar Kerll
  • Hymns & Readings: 406, 1048, Matthew 5: 3-11, 38-41Reader:; Matthew 6: 1-6, 28-33; Mark 2: 23-27; Luke 10: 25-37; John 8: 1-11

April 12 Easter 10am Service

  • Prelude:Fugue in G Major by J.S. Bach
  • Chalice Lighting Music: Rise Up, My Love (1929) by Healey Willan (1880-1968)
    Chalice Singers & Adult Choir
    Click here for a biography of the composer. Rise up my love, my fair one, and come away. For lo, the winter is past, the rain is over and gone; The flowers appear on the earth, the time of the singing of birds is come. Songs of Songs 2: 10-12
  • Candle Music: Alleluia by Randall Thompson
  • Offertory: Heaven-Haven (A Nun Takes the Veil) by Samuel Barber
  • Postlude: Toccata in F Major by Johann Kaspar Kerll

April 19
Guest Speaker:
Didi Emmons "Closing the Food Gap"  

 

  • Prelude: Capriccio Pastorale by Girolamo Frescobaldi (1583-1643)
  • Candle Music: Planting Trees Early in Spring from Hymnody of Earth by Malcolm Dalglish (1952-)
  • Offertory: By a Meadow Brook from Woodland Sketches, op. 51 by Edward MacDowell (1860-1908)
  • Anthem: I Sowed the Seeds of Love, op. 36b (1916) by Gustav Holst (1874-1934)
  • Postlude: Melodie by Robert Schumann (1810-1856)
  • Hymns & Readings: 71, 207, 414, Ethical Eating by Helene Martel

April 26 The Alcotts

  • Prelude: Excerpt from Charles Ives' Piano Sonata No. 2, Concord, Mass., 1840-60 - "The Alcotts" (pub. 1947)
  • Candle Music: Lutheran chorales from J. S. Bach's St. Matthaus Passion (1746)
  • Offertory: Second excerpt from Ives' "The Alcotts"
  • Anthem: The Humble Heart (Eunice Wyeth and Thomas Hammond, Harvard, Mass., 1820)
  • Postlude: Sakura, Japanese Spring Song, English words by Edwin Markham (1852-1940), followed by traditional Japanese dances in the Vestry
  • Hymns & Readings: 7, 61, 79, 414

May 3 Emerson
Guest Artist:
“Trust Thyself ("XC"-1830)” by Wendell Refior

  • Chalice Singers Prelude: Simple Gifts, Shaker song by Joseph Brackett from Alfred, Maine (1848) arranged in 1948-49 by Aaron Copland (1900-1990)
  • Chalice Singers Intergenerational Readings: "Words of Emerson and Thoreau," based on readings #563, 661, 531, 660
  • Offertory: Excerpt from Charles Ives' Piano Sonata No. 2, Concord, Mass., 1840-60 - "Emerson" (pub. 1947)
    Sarah Haera Tocco, piano
  • Anthem: Daffodils (I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud) by Kenneth Seitz
    Sarah Haera Tocco, piano; Kenneth Seitz, conductor
    Poem by William Wordsworth (1770-1850)
    I wandered lonely as a cloud
    That floats on high o'er vales and hills,
    When all at once I saw a crowd,
    A host of golden daffodils;
    Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
    Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

    Continuous as the stars that shine
    and twinkle on the Milky Way,
    They stretched in never-ending line
    along the margin of a bay:
    Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
    tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

    The waves beside them danced; but they
    Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:
    A poet could not but be gay,
    in such a jocund company:
    I gazed - and gazed - but little thought
    what wealth the show to me had brought:

    For oft, when on my couch I lie
    In vacant or in pensive mood,
    They flash upon that inward eye
    Which is the bliss of solitude;
    And then my heart with pleasure fills,
    And dances with the daffodils.
  • Postlude: Frühlingslied (Spring Song), op. 62, no. 6 by Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)
  • Hymns & Readings: 44, 76, 77, 414, a selection from Self-Reliance (1841) by Ralph Waldo Emerson

May 10 Mother's Day
Reciprocity by Heather Kobayashi

  • Prelude: When the Saints Go Marching In
    Intergenerational Family Orchestra
  • Chalice Singers Anthem: The Younger Generation by Aaron Copland
  • Children's Recessional & Candle Music: What a Wonderful World by Bob Thiele, G. D. Weiss, G. Douglas
    Intergenerational Family Orchestra with Andrew Kobayashi, clarinet solo
  • Offertory: Original Composition by Leah Eva Cirker-Stark
  • Anthem: New Orleans Eyes by Coletta Jean Hodges, Leah Eva Cirker-Stark,Heather Kobayashi      
  • Closing Music (Mothers and Daughters):  We Believe in You
    Led by Jennifer Kobayashi with members of the UUlations
  • Postlude: Take Five (1959) by Dave Brubeck (1920-)
    Tina Kambil, alto saxophone; Laura Prichard, piano; Billy Franzosa, bongos; Alex Ptacek-Zimmer, drums
  • Hymns & Readings: 131, 414, 419, 659, The Song I Know by Dar Williams (1967-)

May 17 FPUUA Choir visits the Acton/Stow UU Church

  • Musical Selections in Acton: Chichester Psalms by Leonard Bernstein
    featuring Deborah Feld Fabisciewicz, harp
  • Musical Selection in Arlington: Jazz Favorites by the First Parish Jazz Combo

May 24 Memorial Day Weekend
"The Life and Times of William Ellery Channing, part ii"

  • Prelude, Candle Music, Offertory, Postlude: Sarah Tocco
  • Hymns & Readings: 39, 287, 412, 414, 583

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May 31 Acton/Stow UU Church Choir visits First Parish Arlington

  • Prelude: Music of the Night by Carlos Salzedo
    Deborah Feld Fabisciewicz, harp
  • Candle Music: Chichester Psalms by Leonard Bernstein, movement III.
  • Offertory: Chichester Psalms by Leonard Bernstein, movement II.
  • Anthem: Chichester Psalms by Leonard Bernstein, movement I.
  • Postlude: God be in my Head by John Rutter
    UUlations, directed by Jennifer Kobayashi
  • Hymns & Readings: 414

June 7 Coming of Age Service

  • Prelude: I Waited for the Lord by Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) from his Symphony No. 2 "Lobgesang," op. 52 (1840)
    Laura Prichard and Dorothy May, duet
  • Candle Music: Ubi caritas by Maurice Duruflé
    and Meditation on Ubi caritas Gregorian chant by Sarah Tocco
  • Offertory: Piano Solo
  • Founder's Day Anthem and Reflection: In Quiet Dark by Kenneth Seitz
    Poem by the Rev. John Marsh
    In quiet dark, a settled mind
    Pursues a golden thread;
    Razor thin and broad as wheat field,
    It leads the mind ahead.

    In quiet dark, all living pain
    Is held in sad embrace:
    Your self, your kin, strangers you meet,
    The entire human race.

    In quiet dark, the mind reflects
    On sacrifices made;
    How love did more than could be asked
    Or ever be repaid.

    In quiet dark, the soul accepts
    Things just the way they are:
    The bitter, sour, salty, sweet,
    The shining of a star.
  • Arch of Love Processional: One World by Bob Marley (possible additional music TBA)
  • Credo Sharing: 4 students
  • Musical Reflection: Kingdom in the Sky as performed by DaVinci’s Notebook"arranged by Kenneth Seitz for the UUphonics
    All my life I have been searching for the fabled Promised Land ,
    With my sisters and my brothers,we shall walk there hand in hand.
    Through the trials and tribulations, and the Devil’s cruel temptations ,
    I know that we will all get there one day.
    Notes: Richard Hsu and Greg “Storm” Dicostanzo founded the comedic a cappella group Da Vinci’s Notebook in 1993 in Arlington, Virginia. The band was based at the University of Maryland and achieved early success in with their appearance at the 1996 Harmony Sweepstakes finals.
  • Credo Sharing: 4 students
  • Flower Blessing Music: You Are the New Day by John David (of the British band Airwaves, 1978), arranged by Peter McKnight
    I will love you more than me and more than yesterday,
    if you can but prove to me you are the new day.
    Send the sun in time for dawn,
    let the birds all hail the morning;
    love of life will urge me say,
    "You are the new day."
    When I lay me down at night knowing we must pay,
    thoughts occur that this night might stay yesterday.
    Thoughts that we, as humans small,
    could slow worlds and end it all
    lie around me where they fall, before the new day.
    One more day when time is running out for everyone;
    like a breath I knew would come
    I reach for the new day.
    Hope is my philosophy,
    just needs days in which to be,
    love of life means hope for me
    borne on a new day.
    Notes - Songwriter and record producer John David was born in 1946 in Cardiff, Wales. Having played bass on popular hits with Dave Edmunds in the group Love Sculpture (Sabre Dance, 1969; I Hear You Knocking, 1970; and It's Too Late in 1970 covered by The Searchers), John has had several parallel careers; as a session bass player, solo performer, producer, songwriter and a member of the Rockfield studio band Airwaves which chalked up two Top-100 albums. John has gone on to produce some of the biggest names in rock at his Berry Hill studio, including Robert Plant, the BBC, Cliff Richard, and Little Richard. As a bassist, John has performed with Springsteen, Clapton, Sting, Bryan Adams, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr.
  • Postlude: Java Jive by Ben Oakland and Milton Drake
    UUphonics: Andrew Leonard, Andrew Kobayashi, Michael Prichard, Kenneth Seitz, Michael Prichard
  • Hymns & Readings: 12, 301, 414, 649, 652, "The Walking Stick"

June 14 Flower Communion

  • Guest Artist David Moore: David Moore's reputation in Boston is built on exhibitions of glowing reductive paintings that have a beautiful nuanced surface. He earned his MFA degree in painting at Bard College, NY, where he also studied Theosophy, Sufism, music, photography, and the luminist paintings of the Hudson Valley. He has received residencies at the MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, Millay Colony, Blue Mountain Center, the Edward F. Albee Foundation in Montauk, NY, and the Ballinglen Art Center in Ballycastle, County Mayo, Ireland. Most recently David received the prestigious Pollock/Krasner Award.; and a Painting Fellowship from the Massachusetts Cultural Council. His most recent works are inspired by the landscape of Ireland while in residence at the Ballinglen Arts Foundation. David's musical experience has also influenced his paintings. For the past 35 years he has revived the lost art of playing the Musical Saw. He performs and records across the country, and has been featured at Boston Symphony Hall, on 'The Today Show', and NPR performing jazz, blues, folk, and alternative music. He teaches AP Studio Art, Portfolio Prep, Digital Photography, and Art I at Arlington High School.
  • Prelude: I Sowed the Seeds of Love by Gustav Holst
    dedicated to Lori Kenshaft and Bill Gardiner
  • Candle Music: Shenandoah (traditional Virginian folk song)
    David Moore, musical saw
  • Flower Communion (Placing of Flowers): This Little Light of Mine
    arranged by David Moore, musical saw
  • Offertory: Can the Circle Be Unbroken, first recorded by the Carter Family in the 1920s
    David Moore and the Choir
  • Anthem: Daffodils (I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud) by Kenneth Seitz
    Kenneth Seitz, piano
    Poem by William Wordsworth (1770-1850)
    I wandered lonely as a cloud
    That floats on high o'er vales and hills,
    When all at once I saw a crowd,
    A host of golden daffodils;
    Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
    Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

    Continuous as the stars that shine
    and twinkle on the Milky Way,
    They stretched in never-ending line
    along the margin of a bay:
    Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
    tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

    The waves beside them danced; but they
    Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:
    A poet could not but be gay,
    in such a jocund company:
    I gazed - and gazed - but little thought
    what wealth the show to me had brought:

    For oft, when on my couch I lie
    In vacant or in pensive mood,
    They flash upon that inward eye
    Which is the bliss of solitude;
    And then my heart with pleasure fills,
    And dances with the daffodils.
  • Postlude: The Succession of the Four Sweet Months (from Five Flower Songs) by Benjamin Britten (1913-1976)
    Poem by Robert Herrick (1591-1674)
    First, April, she with mellow showers
    Opens the way for early flowers;
    Then after her comes smiling May,
    In a more rich and sweet array;
    Next enters June, and brings us more
    Gems than those two that went before;
    Then, lastly, July comes, and she
    More wealth brings in than all those three.
  • Hymns & Readings: 305 (co-led by Janet Welby from the Bedford UU congregation), 64, 347

June 21 Father's Day

  • Prelude: King Cotton by John Philip Sousa
    First Parish Intergenerational Orchestra
  • Candle Music: Irish Tune from County Derry by Percy Grainger
  • Offertory: Excerpts from Capriccio Español by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov
  • Postlude: Oh, What a Beautiful Morning by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II
    Michael Prichard, baritone
  • Hymns & Readings: 357, Navy Hymn (Eternal Father, strong to save), Those Winter Sundays by Robert Hayden, Pied Beauty by Gerald Manly Hopkins

June 28 Hymn Sing, led by Anne Goodwin

July 5, led by Glenn Koenig
"From Competition to Compassion"

July 12, led by Chuck Colins and Lori Kenschaft
"Money and the Meaning of Community"

July 19, led by Carolyn Stevens
"Don't Turn the Other Cheek, Lend an Ear: The Power of Empathic Listening"

  • Prelude: Andantino by Jacques Ibert
    First Parish Wind Trio: Carl Schlaikjer, Andrew Kobayashi, Neil Fairbarn
  • Candle Music: Andante by Jacques Ibert
    First Parish Wind Trio
  • Offertory: Serenade by Darius Milhaud
    First Parish Wind Trio
  • Anthem: Rondeau by Darius Milhaud
    First Parish Wind Trio
  • Postlude: Musette by Darius Milhaud
    First Parish Wind Trio
  • Hymns & Readings: 118, 298, 482, 661
    David Agnay, piano accompanist

July 26, led by Kendall Dudley and Cathy Modica
"Learning from the Unexpected"

  • Offertory: Oboe Concerto by Domenico Cimarosa
    Recording by I Musici
  • Anthem: Rondeau by Darius Milhaud
    First Parish Wind Trio
  • Postlude: Musette by Darius Milhaud
    First Parish Wind Trio
  • Hymns & Readings: 38, 446, The Japanese Print, A Blessing by James Tate, What Happened in Fez, "Surprised by Evening" by Robert Bly, Taken by Surprise, Selections from Babel by Gustav Santaolala and others

August 2, led by Eric Segal and Sue Cross
"Create Your Legacy with Love"

  • Prelude: Out on the Farthest Range - Cindy Kallet
    Kate Casa, David Whitford, Eric Segal, musicians
  • Candle Music: Will the Circle be Unbroken? by A. P. Carter
  • Offertory: When I'm Gone by Phil Ochs
  • Postlude: Oh, What a Beautiful Morning by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II
    Michael Prichard, baritone
  • Hymns & Readings: 128, 289, 303, 419, Kalil Gibran "On Work"

August 9, led by David Wright and Gwen Hooper
"Remembering Hiroshima and Nagasaki"

August 16, led by Christina Sillari and Emily Melcher
"An Experience of Resonance: An Exploration of the Healing Power of Sound
"

  • Prelude, Candle Music, Postlude: Lead Crystal Bowls
  • Offertory: One Holy Moment by Phil Ochs
  • Hymns & Readings: 389

August 23, led by the First Parish Meditation Group
"The Laughing Buddha: Buddhist Meditation as a Path to Happiness"

August 31, led by the First Parish Men's Group
"Chicken Soup for the Unitarian Universalist Soul and Body"

September 6
"Why Do We Work?" by Lori Kenshaft

  • Prelude: Prelude in C-sharp Minor by Dmitri Shostakovich
    Beth Harris, piano
  • Candle Music: Prelude in C Major by Dmitri Shostakovich
  • Offertory: Fugue in C Major (abridged) by Dmitri Shostakovich
  • Postlude: Oh, What a Beautiful Morning by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II
    Michael Prichard, baritone
  • Hymns & Readings: 128, 289, 303, 419, Kalil Gibran "On Work"

     

 

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