History of the Music Program: 2010-2011

First Parish Unitarian Universalist of Arlington

 

2010-2011
Director of Music: Laura Stanfield Prichard
Organist/Pianist: Sarah Haera Tocco
Composer in Residence & Music Director Emeritus: Kenneth Seitz

  • Prelude: Andante by George Frederic Handel (1685-1759)
  • Intergenerational Story: Jonah
  • Piano Improvisation by Sarah Haera Tocco
  • Water Communion Music: Away from the Roll of the Sea by Cape Breton composer Allister MacGillivray (1947-)
    MacGillivray is an active composer and folksinger throughout his native Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. As a record producer, he has worked with fiddler Buddy McMaster and the Men of the Deeps (a male choir of working coal miners), and he is working on commissions from the Toronto Children's Chorus and the Elektra Women's Choir (Vancouver).
  • Sounding of the Shofar: Andee Rubin and Dorothy May
  • Anthem: Down in the River to Pray from the Coen Brothers' film Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?
  • Offertory: Reflets dans l'eau (Reflections in the Water) from Images (1905) by Claude Debussy
    Claude Debussy's Reflets dans l'eau depicts the varied opalescence of light and water. The shifting harmonies mirror a French concern with these two fluctuating media. Reflets was published in 1905 as part of the collection entitled Images, and Debussy described it as being full of his "most recent discoveries in harmonic chemistry."
  • Postlude: Rad HaLaila (campfire Horah) arr. by Max Frey
    This Hassidic tune is known both as a wordless "Nigun" (sacred melody), and as the Israeli folksong Rad HaLaila (Night falls). Also known as the hymn E-l Mistater among central European rabbis, it seems to have been one of the melodies most often (privately) sung on Shabbat in the camps and pogroms during WWII. The words sung today were written by prize-wining Israeli poet Ya'akov Orland, a secular pioneer immigrant from a hassidic miliieu. He came to Palestine as a refugee from the 1919 Ukrainian pogroms, and the song became a musical symbol of pre- and post-1948 Israel, with its new lyrics.
    Translation: Night approaches, our song rises, breaking through the sky.
    Turn, turn, our hora is renewed a second time. Turn, turn, for our road has no end;
    for the chain is continued, for our hearts are one heart, always and forever.
  • Hymns & Readings: 358, 368, 407, 729

Yom Kippur is Sept. 17/18

Sept. 19
Rev. Marta Flanagan: UU Sermon Series: We Believe, We Pray, We Doubt

  • Prelude: Priidite, poklonimsia (Come Let Us Worship), op. 31, no. 5 by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943)
    Online score in Russian only, pp. 40-41 - http://imslp.org/wiki/Liturgy_of_St_John_Chrysostom,_Op.31_%28Rachmaninoff,_Sergei%29
    The text of the Prelude is taken from the Liturgy of St. John, the primary worship service of the Eastern Orthodox Church. This work, too "modern" to be sung in Russian services during the composer's lifetime, beckons us in from the realm of worldly chaos to the peace and order of the spiritual domain. The shape of the final Alleluia depicts the bowing motion of the faithful. Composed following his 1909 tour of the US, the work was premiered in New York City in 1914, and was one of Rachmaninoff's favorite compositions.

    Text:
    Priidite, poklonimsia i pripadem ko Hristu.
    (Come, let us worship and fall down to the anointed one.)
    Spasi nash, cyne Bozhyi, voskresyi iz mertvykh, poyushchiya ti: Alliluya.
    (We thank you, son of God, risen from the dead, we sing to you: Alleluia.)
  • Anthem: Os Justi by Anton Bruckner (1824-1894)
    Online score - http://www2.cpdl.org/wiki/images/sheet/bruckner/bruc-005.pdf
    Online midi practice file - http://www1.cpdl.org/wiki/images/sound/bruckner/bruc-005.mid
    Notes: Anton Bruckner's motets are short masterpieces by the devout Catholic Austrian church musician and orchestral composer. Os Justi, with its long expansive lines, clear counterpoint, and expressive suspensions is one of his best.
    The just man shall expound to us wise and worthy things,
    His speech shall tell us of righteousness.
    The statutes of God shall be ever in his heart.
  • Musical Interlude: Improvisation on "Bridge Over Troubled Water" by Sarah Haera Tocco
    The Lay Ministers of First Parish administered a "Wider Network of Care" survey.
  • Candle Music: Bogoroditsye Devo (Hail Mary), op. 37, no. 6 by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943)
    Online score - http://www1.cpdl.org/wiki/images/5/5e/Rachmaninov_Bogorodyitse_Dyevo_PML.pdf
    Online practice midi organ file (faster than we will sing) - http://www1.cpdl.org/wiki/images/c/c2/Rachmaninov_Bogorodyitse_Dyevo_PML.mid
    Online midi practice files for all of the Rachmaninoff Vespers - http://cyberbass.org/
    After giving due praise to God, the Orthodox Church always pays homage to the Virgin Mary — the Theotokos (lit., “the one who gave birth to God”). The vesperal portion of Rachmaninoff's All-Night Vigil includes the “Bogoroditse Devo” (Rejoice, O Virgin), the scriptural angelic greeting. Although the hymn is written in a freely harmonic style, the narrow compass of the melody, which gently rises and falls in inflection along with the words, once again shows that Rachmaninoff never strayed far from the “chant style” anywhere in the Vigil.
    Bogoroditse Devo, raduysia, (Rejoice, O Virgin Theotokos,)
    Blagodatnaya Mariye, Ghospod s Toboyu. (Mary full of grace, the Lord is with Thee.)
    Blagoslovenna Ti v zhenah, (Blessed art Thou among women,)
    i blagosloven Plod chreva Tvoyego, (and blessed is the Fruit of Thy womb,)
    yako Spasa rodila yesi dush nashih. (for Thou hast borne the Savior of our souls.)
  • Offertory: Avinu malkeinu (Yom Kippur prayer) by Max Janowski (1912-1991)
    Michael Prichard, baritone
    Translation: Hear our voice, O father, pity and be compassionate to us, and accept, with compassion and favor, our prayers. (Yom Kippur prayer)
    Notes: Max Janowski was born in Berlin, Germany and emigrated to the United States in 1937. He was a prodigious twentieth-century composer, conductor, and organist whose liturgical compositions have been performed in concert halls, synagogues, churches and colleges throughout the world. Janowski was the beloved music director, organist, and choir director at six Chicago-area synagogues and Unitarian congregations.
  • Postlude: Voluntary No. 5 by Daniel Pinkham
  • Notes for the Rachmaninoff Vespers: Sergei Rachmaninoff’s emergence as a composer coincided with a renaissance of Russian sacred choral music in the late nineteenth century. One of the prime factors that contributed was the creative environment fostered by the Moscow Synodal Choir and Synodal School of Church Singing. Rachmaninoff dedicated the All-Night Vigil to Stephan Smolensky, director of the school from 1886-1901 who encouraged composers to use traditional chants in their compositions. Rachmaninoff’s fellow student at the Moscow Philharmonic Society, Nikolai Danilin, became principal conductor of the Synodal Choir in 1910, and led to its greatest triumphs including the premieres in 1910 and 1915, respectively, of the Liturgy and the All-Night Vigil.
    The unchanging hymns of the All-Night Vigil which were sung Saturday evenings before feast days were familiar to even a secular composer like Rachmaninoff. His lack of intimacy with arcane constructions of Church Slavonic and liturgical minutiae of the services actually had a positive effect; as a sensitive artist, he gave thoughtful consideration to every text, using a subjective, personal, approach, eliciting debates as to whether his sacred choral works are intended for performance in actual church services, or in public concerts of sacred choral music (common in the nineteenth century.) The years separating the Liturgy and the All-Night Vigil (1910-1915) have been described as a watershed in Rachmaninoff’s creative output, a time of turning away from the elegiac lyricism that characterized his earlier works toward bolder, more modernist tendencies.
    Alexander Petrovich Smirnov, who in 1915 was a boy alto in the Moscow Synodal Choir, describes in his memoirs the singers’ first encounter with Rachmaninoff’s score: In February 1915, at one of the regular rehearsals of the Synodal Choir, there appeared on the music stands a new score in a blue cover. Opening the music, we saw the inscription: “S. Rachmaninoff.All-Night Vigil.To the memory of Stepan Vasil’yevich Smolensky.”The score, like all the Synodal Choir’s music, had been reproduced lithographically and had not yet gone through any publishing house.We were to be the first to perform the work on the concert stage... The task before us evoked a sense of joy both among the singers, and on the part of our conductor, Nikolai Mikhailovich Danilin, as could be perceived from his uplifted mood.This was due, in no small measure, to the dedication: for the Synodal Choir and School, the name of S.V. Smolensky was sacred.We began to rehearse with a sense of emotion...The work, which was completed by the composer in early February, was premiered on 10 March [1915] and received high acclaim from both music critics and listeners: equally admired were the music and the quality of the performance. Despite the rule that prohibited applause at performances of sacred music, following the final chord of the Vigil the audience burst into tumultuous applause [but] only Rachmaninoff went out onto the empty stage, returning backstage with a twig of while lilac. A reviewer, V. Derzhanovsky, noted that in the All-Night Vigil, Rachmaninoff’s style exhibited not only positive growth, but also a new universality — a quality sought after by many creative artists of that period: Perhaps never before has Rachmaninoff approached so close to the people, to their style, to their soul, as in this work. And, perhaps, this work in particular bespeaks a broadening of his creative flight, a conquest of new dimensions of the spirit, and, hence, a genuine evolution of his powerful talent.z
    The All-Night Vigil service, as celebrated in a typical Russian cathedral or parish setting at the turn of the twentieth century, had two variants: the Resurrectional Vigil served on Saturday night (at the start of the liturgical cycle for Sunday), and the Festal Vigil served on the eves of major feast days. Both variants shared a certain number of fixed, unchanging hymns, which constituted the ordinary of the Vigil; hymns which where “proper” to each type of Vigil, and hymns which change according to the liturgical calendar. In choosing which hymns from the Vigil service to set, Rachmaninoff’s foremost concern was the large-scale artistic unity and balance of the overall cycle, rather than the more narrow scope of liturgical requirements. Earlier composers had set various combinations of these hymns and responses with varying degrees of chant-based and freely composed melodies including Ippolitov-Ivanov, Nikolsky, Gretchaninoff, Chesnokov, and Tchaikovsky. Rachmaninoff’s ultimate artistic goals determined the manner in which he borrowed and used chant melodies. From the time Tchaikovsky brought the melodic treasury of chant to the attention of serious musicians, Russian composers sought various ways of harmonizing or contrapuntally treating the chants.While critics noted his “‘loving and careful attitude with respect to the ancient church chants,” Rachmaninoff’s choice and treatment of the melodies was devoid of dogmatic strictness. He used both melodies that were widely sung in church and had seen numerous prior arrangements, such as the Russian “Greek” Chant for No. 2, and the Kievan Chants for No. 4, and No. 5, as well as znamenny chant melodies that were hardly ever heard in church. He approached the melodies with a considerable degree of freedom, in some instances altering them slightly, in other instances transposing them and distributing them among various voices, as he displayed them in varied harmonic or contrapuntal surroundings. Rachmaninoff’s free composed “counterfeits” are so skillfully created that a person not intimately familiar with the actual chant repertoire would have a difficult time distinguishing them from the genuine melodies.
  • Hymns & Readings: 23, 131, 145, 413

Autumn begins on Sept. 22

Sept. 26
Rev. Marta Flanagan: UU Sermon Series: We Believe, We Pray, We Doubt

  • Prelude: Adagio from Concerto in B-flat Major by Giuglio Taglietti, arranged by Johann Walther
  • Anthem: Prayer of the Little Bird with text by Carmen Bernos De Gasztold (1919-)
    Holly Loring, soprano; Sarah Tocco, piano
    Dear God, I don't know how to pray by myself very well,
       But will You please protect my little nest from wind and rain?
       Put a great deal of dew on the flowers, many seeds in my way.
       Make Your blue very high, your branches lissome;
       Let Your kind light stay late in the sky and set my heart brimming
           with such music that I must sing, sing, sing... Please Lord. Amen.
  • Candle Music: Ninye Otpushchayeshchi, op. 37, no. 5 by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943)
    Score in Russian only - http://imslp.org/wiki/Vespers,_Op.37_%28Rachmaninoff,_Sergei%29
    Online midi practice files for all of the Rachmaninoff Vespers - http://cyberbass.org/
    No.5 — The Canticle of St. Symeon, “Lord, now lettest Thou” (Luke 2:29-32), describes the fulfillment of the final promise, as in the Old Testament Temple the elder Symeon recognizes the Messiah in the infant Jesus, brought there by His parents, according to the Law. The slow rocking motion of the accompanying voices on two-note descending figures, akin to a lullaby, imparts to the piece a static and peaceful quality.With a prayer in the “first person,” Rachmaninoff again chooses a single voice (tenor soloist) as the medium of the message. This was reputedly Rachmaninoff’s favorite movement in the Vigil, which the composer requested be performed at his funeral, a wish that was not to be carried out.
    Nine otpushchayeshi raba Tvoyego, Vladiko, (Lord, now lettest Thou Thy servant)
    po glagolu Tvoyemu s mirom, (depart in peace, according to Thy word,)
    yako videsta ochi moi spaseniye Tvoye, (for mine eyes have seen Thy salvation,)
    yezhe yesi ugotoval pred litsem vseh liudey, (which Thou prepared before the face of all people)
    svet vo otkroveniye yazikov, (a light to enlighten the Gentiles,)
    i slavu liudey Tvoih Izrailia. (and the glory of Thy people Israel.)
  • Offertory: Thou Knowest, Lord, the Secrets of our Hearts (1695) by Henry Purcell (1659-1695)
    Online score - http://www1.cpdl.org/wiki/images/sheet/purc-001.pdf
    Online piano practice file (correct pitches, incorrect articulation) - http://www1.cpdl.org/wiki/images/sound/purc-001.mid
    Purcell’s second setting of this text was written for Queen Mary’s funeral on March 5, 1695, when it was accompanied by “flat Mournfull Trumpets” (“flat” because slide trumpets were used instead of the brighter D trumpets, and “mournful” indicating a very slow tempo). Nineteen manuscript sources in a catalog of Purcell’s complete works indicate its popularity in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This anthem takes its powerful effect from its extreme simplicity, moving in solemn block harmonies all the way until a brief touch of imitation in the final phrase. The piece was one of Purcell's favorites, and was also performed at his own funeral, nine months after the premiere.
    Thou knowest, Lord, the secrets of our hearts;
    shut not Thy merciful ears unto our prayer;
    but spare us, Lord most holy,
    O God most mighty,
    O holy and most merciful Saviour,
    Thou most worthy Judge eternal,
    suffer us not, at our last hour,
    for any pains of death, to fall from thee. Amen.
  • Postlude: Allegro from Concerto in B-flat Major by Giuglio Taglietti, arranged by Johann Walther
  • Hymns & Readings: 67, 90, 123, 391, 413

Oct. 3
Rev. Marta Flanagan: UU Sermon Series: We Believe, We Pray, We Doubt

  • Prelude: Mata del Anima Sola (Tree of the Lonely Soul) by Antonio Estévez (1916-1988, Venezuela)
    Jean Renard Ward, tenor soloist
    Use this link for midi practice files for individual voice parts http://www.well.com/~noahj/wintertunes.htm
    Notes on the poetry: The dramatic poetry of educator and politician Alberto Arvelo Torrealba (1918-1971) focused on solitary, heroic figures. His greatest poem is the epic Florentino y el diablo, a Faustian tale set on the Venezuelan plains.
    Translation: Tree of the lonely soul, wide opening of the riverside, now you will be able to say, "Here slept the clear-voiced one." With the whistle and sting of the twisting wind, the dappled and violet dusk entered the corral. The night, a tired mare, shakes her mane and black tail above the river; and, in its silence, your ghostly heart is filled with awe.
    Notes on the composer: Antonio Estévez (1916-1998) was the musical founder/composer of the Central University of Venezuela Chorale and the Phonology Music Institute at the Simon Bolivar Center (Venezuela). In the 1930s, he played oboe with the Caracas Military Band and the Venezuela Symphony Orchestra and was awarded the National Music Prize (like our Pulitzer) in 1949. In the 1960s he was an influential contributor at the Research Center for French Broadcasting in Paris. This piece has two distinct sections: one slow and meditative, and the other very quick and rhythmic based on a combined 3/4 and 6/8 meter which is characteristic of a dance called joropo. The music depicts the solitude and mystery of the llanos, the high plains of Venezuela, while the tenor solo represents the llanero, or “man of the plains” whose songs are improvised. In the joropo section, the choir imitates the instruments that are traditionally used to play the dance. The altos and tenors have the rhythm of the cuatro (a small guitar with only four strings), the sopranos imitate the diatonic harp, and the basses sing the guitar bordones, all of which combine to provide the “instrumental” accompaniment to the tenor soloist.
  • Candle Music: Berceuse by Frederic Chopin
  • Offertory: Wanting Memories by Dr. Ysaye Barnwell (UU composer and Sweet Honey in the Rock member)
  • Postlude: Präludium by Willy Burkhard
  • Hymns & Readings: 40, 108, 295, 413

Oct. 10 Columbus Day Weekend
The Rev. Susan Moran, guest preacher: Suffering 101
Rev. Susan Moran has served as Assistant Minister in Marblehead and Winchester and is currently the Director of the Center for Spirituality. She is also in search for a part-time or full-time parish ministry position. She lives on the North Shore with her daughters and one ridicuously friendly lab.

  • Prelude: Fantasia by Johann Pachelbel
  • Candle Music: II. Largo e Dolce from Sonata for Flute in B minor (1735), BWV 1030 by J. S. Bach (1685-1750)
    Michelle Nover, flute; Sarah Haera Tocco, piano
  • Offertory: Andante in C Major (1778), K. 315 for flute and piano by Wolfgang A. Mozart (1756-1791)
  • Anthem (preceding sermon): When Fall Comes to New England by Cheryl Wheeler, arr. Diane Taraz
    UUlations, led by Jennifer Kobayashi
    Notes: A beautiful song about fall in New England. This song contains some of the most beautiful visual pictures that Cheryl has painted. She started writing this while on a little island called Cuttyhunk, which is part of the Elizabeth Islands in September of 1990. When Christine Lavin first heard this song, she insisted that Cheryl record it. It first appeared in the Christine's compilation album When October Goes.
  • Musical Response to sermon: Bridge Over Troubled Water by Paul Simon
    Lisa Watkins, guest soloist
  • Postlude: Toccata in F Major by Dietrich Buxtehude (1653-1706)
  • Hymns & Readings: 86, 128, 131, 413, Job 2

Oct. 17 Ferry Beach Weekend [MF preaching on Star Trek]

  • Prelude: Walking Tune (1905) by Percy Grainger (1882-1961)
    Woodwind Quintet
  • Candle Music: Star Trek "The Inner Light" (1992) by Jay Chattaway (1946-), arr. by Carrie Burdzinski
    Notes: This is the theme from the twenty-fifth episode of the Paramount television series Star Trek: the Next Generation. Writer Morgan Gendel named the episode after The Inner Light, a song written by George Harrison (a B-side to Lady Madonna). The lyrics of Harrison's song are in turn based on the 47th chapter of the Taoist Tao Te Ching:
    Without going outside his door, one understands (all that takes place) under the sky; without looking out from his window, one sees the Tao of Heaven. The farther that one goes out (from himself), the less he knows. Therefore the sages got their knowledge without travelling; gave their (right) names to things without seeing them; and accomplished their ends without any purpose of doing so.
    According to Gendel, the song "captured the theme of the show: that Captain Picard experienced a lifetime of memories all in his head." In this series, the Captain of the Starship USS Enterprise (NCC-1701-D) plays a Ressikan flute (a type of pennywhistle) in solo and duet selections in several episodes. This series takes place roughly 70 years after the final missions of the original Enterprise crew under the command of James T. Kirk.
  • Offertory: II. Andante quasi allegretto "Chorale St. Antoni" from Divertimento No. 1 in B-flat by F. J. Haydn (1732-1809), arr. by the Philadelphia Wind Quintet
  • Anthem: ‘Eng Chalqach-mey by Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)
    Text from the Tempest in the original Klingon
  • Postlude: I. Allegro con spirito from Divertimento in B-flat
  • Hymns & Readings: 413

Oct. 24 [MF preaching on Green Sanctuary, followed by Reverberations]

  • Prelude: Prelude for Organ by Henry Purcell
  • Candle Music: Arabeske, op.18 by Robert Schumann
  • Offertory: Gentle Arms of Eden by Dave Carter and Tracy Grammer
    Performed by "Somebody's Mother": Meg Candilore, Anne Goodwin, Annette
    Sawyer
    Chorus: This is my home, this is my only home,
    This is the only sacred ground that I have ever known.
    And should I stray in the dark night alone,
    Rock me goddess, in the gentle arms of eden.
  • Anthem: The Amplitude of Space by Kenneth Seitz
    Text by John Hall Wheelock, directed by the composer
    The amplitude of space comes down to your
    own door,
    And equal with the stars, the common and the street
    Are part of beauty's light that shines from shore to shore
    The universe divine lies round us at our feet
    All tangible, of dust, and holy to the core.

    Not in some world beyond lies wonder, not above,
    Nor throned among the spheres, nor set for days to be;
    But over and beneath, or if you rest and move,
    Extends the shining fact, starry infinity,
    And all the hell of hate, and all the heav'n of love.
  • Postlude: This We Know by Ron Jeffers (1943-)
    This we know. The earth does not belong to us; we belong to the earth.
    This we know. All things are connected like the blood that unites one family.
    Whate’er befalls the earth befalls the children of the earth.
    This we know. We did not weave the web of life, we are merely a strand in it.
    Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves. This we know.
    Use this link to hear a choral recording of this piece: http://www.vocalartsingers.org/samples/This%20We%20Know.mp3
  • Hymns & Readings: 413

Oct. 31 1pm Hallowe'en Musicale/Talent Show with costumes

Oct. 31 [not an intergenerational service]
Rev. Marta Flanagan:
Samhain/All Soul's

  • Prelude: Mark the Flight of Time by Diane Taraz Shriver
    Thi new composition includes a special part for First Parish's historic bell, rung before each Sunday service from the back of the sanctuary.
  • Offertory: The Peace of Wild Things by Joan Szymko
    This work is based on a beautiful poem by Kentuckian Wendell Berry. Joan Szymko is a composer and choral conductor who has led choirs in the Pacific Northwest for over 25 years, and has a significant body of choral work, especially prolific in literature for women’s voices. This work was written in 2006 and is “dedicated to the welfare of all beings.”
    When despair for the world grows in me
    and I wake in the night at the least sound
    in fear of what my life and children's lives may be,
    I go lie down where the wood drake
    rests in his beauty on the water, and the great heron feeds.
    I come into the peace of wild things
    who do not tax their lives with forethought
    of grief. I come into the presence of still water.
    And I feel above me the day-blind stars
    waiting with their light. For a time
    I rest in the grace of the world, and am free.
  • Candle Music: Rad HaLaila (campfire Horah) arr. by Max Frey
    This Hassidic tune is known both as a wordless "Nigun" (sacred melody), and as the Israeli folksong Rad HaLaila (Night falls). Also known as the hymn E-l Mistater among central European rabbis, it seems to have been one of the melodies most often (privately) sung on Shabbat in the camps and pogroms during WWII. The words sung today were written by prize-wining Israeli poet Ya'akov Orland, a secular pioneer immigrant from a hassidic miliieu. He came to Palestine as a refugee from the 1919 Ukrainian pogroms, and the song became a musical symbol of pre- and post-1948 Israel, with its new lyrics.
    Translation: Night approaches, our song rises, breaking through the sky.
    Turn, turn, our hora is renewed a second time. Turn, turn, for our road has no end;
    for the chain is continued, for our hearts are one heart, always and forever.
  • Postlude: The Cloud-Capped Towers by Ralph Vaughan Williams
  • Hymns & Readings: 413

Nov. 7 [MF preaching]
Daylight Savings Time Ends

  • Prelude: Lux aeterna (Eternal Light) from Morten Lauridsen's Lux Aeterna
    Online midi practice files for all of the Lauridsen Lux Aeterna - http://cyberbass.org/
  • Candle Music: O nata lux (O newborn light) from Morten Lauridsen's Lux Aeterna
    Online midi practice files for all of the Lauridsen Lux Aeterna - http://cyberbass.org/
  • Offertory: Agnus Dei (Lamb of God) from Morten Lauridsen's Lux Aeterna
    Online midi practice files for all of the Lauridsen Lux Aeterna - http://cyberbass.org/
  • Postlude: Alleluia, Amen from Morten Lauridsen's Lux Aeterna
  • Hymns & Readings: 46, 101, 103, 409

Nov. 14 Shinn service, organized by Kiki Giatis

  • Prelude: Flute Loops
  • Candle Music: Flute Loops
  • Offertory: Flute Loops
  • Anthem: Kenneth Seitz, piano
  • Postlude: Flute Loops
  • Hymns & Readings: 413

Nov. 20 Harvest Moon Fair
Café Music in the Vestry

Nov. 21
Rev. Marta Flanagan: Thanksgiving Intergenerational Service

  • Prelude: Love Begins by Trevor Hochman (OOTB Alum, '93)
    Out of the Blue of Yale University
  • Anthem: Higher Love by Steve Winwood
    Out of the Blue of Yale University
  • Offertory: She Moved trough the Fair by Timoty Takach
  • Offertory Hymn: Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing
    The Adult Choir sang the first verse in Navajo from Navajo Hymns of Faith (1978).
    Tó Háálíiji' ahohkáahgo; baa hózhóogo dahohtaal.
    Water is flowing out where we gather,
    we are happy and sing together.
    Bijooba' doo nineelnéehii; baa ha'niihgo dahohtaal.
    His grace doesn’t wither; we praise it and sing together.
    Yá'aashdi yee dahataalii, éí bee shiníítíil dooleel, 
    In heaven, they sang, in order to guide me.
    Ayóó'óó'ní yee hááshííltí, áko éí bee baa hashniih.
    By love, I was lifted, so that I now raise my voice in praise.
  • Cornbread Communion Music: Improvisation on "Come, Thou Fount"
    Sarah Haera Tocco, piano
  • Postlude: Irish Blessing by Joyce Eilers
    Out of the Blue of Yale University (traditional alumni closing song)
    Laura Stanfield Prichard (OOTB Founding Pitch, '90)
  • Hymns & Readings: 67, 95, 126, 349

Nov. 28 Urban Borders and Social Justice
"A Small Army of Love" - guest preacher Rev. Kate Wilkinson

  • Prelude: Banish Misfortune
    Stephanie Franzosa, flute; David Whitford, violin; Paul Franzosa, guitar
  • Candles: Away from the Roll of the Sea by Cape Breton composer Allister MacGillivray (1947-)
    MacGillivray is an active composer and folksinger throughout his native Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. As a record producer, he has worked with fiddler Buddy McMaster and the Men of the Deeps (a male choir of working coal miners), and he is working on commissions from the Toronto Children's Chorus and the Elektra Women's Choir (Vancouver).
  • Offertory: Londonderry Air
    Stephanie Franzosa, flute; David Whitford, violin; Paul Franzosa, guitar
  • Postlude: Jack Mitchell's Polka
    Stephanie Franzosa, flute; David Whitford, violin; Paul Franzosa, guitar
  • Hymns & Readings: 21, 131, 146

Dec. 3 Alliance Holiday Party

  • O Tannenbaum (German Traditional Carol)
  • Costumed Play - A Charlie Brown Christmas (1965) by Charles Schultz with music by Vince Guaraldi and lyrics by Lee Mendelson
  • Songs for the Costumed Play
    Christmas Time is Here
    Linus and Lucy
    Schroeder plays: Beethoven's Für Elise, Classical Jingle Bells
    O Little Town of Bethlehem
    Hark, the Herald Angels Sing
    O Christmas Tree
    (An instrumental version of O Tannenbaum)

Dec. 5 Advent II [MF preaching]

  • Prelude: Veni Emmanuel
    UUlations, directed by Jennifer Kobayashi
  • Candle Music: Sabbath Prayer by Jerrold Lewis ("Jerry") Bock (1928-2010)
    Dedicated to the composer, who passed away on November 3
  • Offertory: Excerpts from Sonate by César Franck
  • Postlude: Hark, How the Bells adapted in 1936 by Peter Wilhousky (1902-1978) from a 1916 Ukrainian song by Mykola Leontovich (1877-1921)
    Click here to hear a recording of this selection by the Cal Tech combined Glee Clubs
    Click here to hear a keyboard play all the parts (SATB)
  • Hymns & Readings: 413

Dec. 12 Winter Music Service

Dec. 17 Embracing the Darkness - A Service Acknowledging the Season's Shadows featuring the UUlations

  • Prelude: Winter by Jennifer Kobayashi
  • Musical Interlude: Mi Shebeirach by Debbie Freedman and Drorah Steel
  • Anthem: God be in my Head by John Rutter
  • Musical Reflection: Mark the Flight of Time by Diane Taraz
  • Postlude: Farthest Field by UUlations
  • Hymns & Readings: 55, 266, In the Bleak Midwinter (verse 1 by Christina Rosetti, verses 2-4 by Diane Taraz Sriver), Kindness by Naomi Shihab Nye, Under the Walnut Tree by Lynn Martin, Psalm 23, Untitled by Martha Courtot

Dec. 19 Intergenerational Service - stories of Mary
Winter begins on Dec. 21

  • Prelude: Rise Up, Shepherd, and Follow
    Laura Prichard, soprano
  • Musical Interlude: Ave Maria by Javier Busto (Basque, 1949-)
  • Offertory: Ave Maria by Franz Biebl (German, 1906-2001)
    Alan Schweitzer, Jean Renard Ward, Carolyn Hodges, solos
    Laurie Francis-Wright, Dorothy May, Andrew Leonard, trio
    Online practice files by individual voice part:
    http://bugev.com/bugev/Chorale/b/Biebl-Franz/AveMaria/index.html
    Online piano practice files: http://users.skynet.be/fa976167/Practice%20Midi%20Files/Ave%20Maria%20(Biebl)%20-%20All.mid
  • Musical Reflection: March of the Kings from Amahl and the Night Visitors by Gian Carlo Menotti
    John Hodges, Andrew Kobayashi, Michael Prichard, Jean Renard Ward
  • Postlude: Piano Improvisation on Carols by Sarah Haera Tocco
  • Hymns & Readings: 86, 231, 235

Dec. 24 Evening Services at 5pm and 7pm

  • Organ Prelude: Selections on the 1869 E. & G.G. Hook Organ
  • Choral Preludes: Sabbath Prayer by Jerrold Lewis ("Jerry") Bock (1928-2010)
    Dedicated to the composer, who passed away on November 3
    Christmas Time is Here
    by Vince Guaraldi (1928-1976), lyrics by Lee Mendelson (1933-)
  • Anthem: Cantique de Noël/O Holy Night by Adolphe Adam (1803-1856), composer of the ballet Giselle with English words by Unitarian minister John Sullivan Dwight (1813-1893)
  • Offertory: The Lamb by Fenno Follensbea Heath, Jr. (1926-2008), poem by William Blake (1757-1827)
    Organ Improvisation on Heath's Lamb by Sarah Haera Tocco
  • Hymns: O Come, All Ye Faithful; Once in Royal David's City; It Came Upon a Midnight Clear; The First Nowell; Silent Night; Joy to the World
  • Readings: Luke 2:1-20; Christmas Returns and Light Candles by Howard Thurman
    Howard Thurman (1899 –1981) was a theologian and Civil Rights leader. He was Dean of Theology at the chapels at Howard University and Boston University for two decades, spiritual advisor to Martin Luther King, Jr., and author of twenty books.

Dec. 26 Poetry Service
Cathie Desjardins, poetry service coordinator

  • Prelude: Pavane pour une infante defunte (1899) by Maurice Ravel (1875-1937)
    Drew Pereli, piano
  • Candle Music: Allemande from the Suite No. 1 in G Major, BWV 1007
    by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
    Dora Pereli, cello
  • Offertory: Andante cantabile from Sonata, op. 13, no. 8, "Pathetique" (1799) by Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
  • Postlude: Sarabande from the Suite No. 1 by Bach
  • Hymns: 239, 240, 241

Jan. 2 [MF preaching]

  • Prelude: Ceora
    Physion Jazz Quartet (AHS Seniors including Benjamin Matlack, trumpet/guitar; Chris Hamblin, vocals/keyboards; Otto Briner, bass)
  • Candle Music: Meditation on Summertime by George Gershwin (1898-1937)
  • Offertory: Sonata by by Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
  • Postlude: We Can Listen to Songs (Together)
  • Hymns & Readings: 29, 259, 350, 413, 543

Jan. 9 "Being Called/Discernment" [MF preaching]
Possible date for Social Justice Fair

  • Prelude: The Lone Wild Bird by Thomas Somerville (1940-)
    Anne Quadgraas, flute
    Notes: Thomas Somerville’s delicate setting of "The Lone, Wild Bird" uses the solo flute to represent the radiance of a soaring bird (or a spirit) in lofty flight. Dr. Somerville is Emeritus Faculty at Occidental College and former conductor of the Oxy choral ensembles. He is Artistic Director and Conductor of the Los Angeles Bach Festival, Director of Music at the First Congregational Church of Los Angeles, and Associate Teacher of the Master Class in Conducting at the Oregon Bach Festival.
  • Candle Music: Sarah Haera Tocco, piano
  • Offertories: Come Sunday by Edward "Duke" Ellington  (1899-1974) 
    Hallelujah by Leonard Cohen (1984), arr. by Jeff Buckley (1994) 
    Benjamin Matlack and Anna Marquis, guitar and voice
  • Postlude: Organ
  • Hymns and Readings: 6, 298, 348, 413, Micah 6:8

Jan. 16 MLK Sunday "Lessons from Selma"

  • Prelude: Beautiful Tree by Rain Perry
    Benjamin Matlack and Anna Marquis, Youth Group seniors
  • Anthem: Who Knows by Benjamin Matlack and Anna Marquis
  • Candle Music: MLK by U2, arr. by Bob Chilcott 
  • Offertory: Every Time I Feel the Spirit by William Dawson (1899-1990)  
    Dawson conducted the Tuskeegee Institute Choir from 1931-1956.  
  • Postlude: Conversation by Benjamin Matlack and Anna Marquis
  • Hymns and Readings: 121, 149, 199, 413

Jan. 23 "The Missing Years" Leaf Seligman preaching]

  • Prelude: Air from Suite No. 3 in D Major, BWV 1068 by J. S. Bach (1685-1750), arr. by Bennett Williams as Breezy Bach (in G) 
  • Chalice Lighting Song: This Little Light of Mine (1920) by Harry Dixon Loes (1895-1965) 
    Chalice Singers Youth Choir 
  • Candle Music: Ach, nun ist mein Jesus hin from the St. Matthew Passion by Bach 
    Cindy Vredevelt, alto, with the First Parish Choir 
    Translation of the Candle Music: (Soloist: Alas, now my Jesus is gone!)
    - Where, then, has your beloved gone, O most beautiful among women? - 
    (Is it possible, can I behold it? )
    - Which way has your beloved gone? -  
    (Ah! My lamb is in the claws of a tiger.)
    - We will seek him with you. -  
    (What shall I say to the soul, when she asks me anxiously: Where has he gone?)
  • Offertory: Instrumental music
  • Choral Response: Befiehl du deine Wege, hymn chorale from the St. Matthew Passion by Bach 
    Translation of the Choral Response: 
    Commit your path, and the troubles of your heart, to the most faithful caretaker. 
    He, who to the clouds, air, and winds gives path, course, and passage, 
        will help you find your way. 
  • Postlude: Instrumental music
  • Hymns and Readings: 30, 44, 99, 413
  • Notes on the Choral Music for today: The choir’s text in the Candle Music comes from the Song of Songs, chapter 6, verse 1. The choir’s German text was translated from the original Hebrew by Martin Luther. Bach inserted new words for the alto soloist to make “the beloved” of the Old Testament text relevant to his Lutheran audience, as this music comes from a large composition suitable for performance on Good Friday. The Choral Response is a short German hymn text sung at the end of Good Friday services. 
  • In spite of the lack of explicitly religious content in this chapter of the Bible, composers often create settings of it for liturgical use. Some interpret the Song as an allegorical representation of the relationship between God and Israel, or for Christians, God and the Church, and in Bach’s case, between Jesus and the human soul, in marriage. Our Spring Music Service will feature settings from the Song of Songs, and our Easter music this year will include two colonial settings of Song of Songs texts by the Boston composer William Billings (1746-1800).

Jan. 30 "Why Church?" Stewardship Sunday [MF preaching]

  • Prelude: Prelude in G Minor by Johann S. Bach (1685-1750)
  • Anthem: Operator, Information, arr. by Kenneth Seitz
    UUPhonics: Andy and Jennifer Kobayashi, Andrew Leonard, Jean Renard Ward, Kenneth Seitz
  • Candle Music: A Quiet Place by Ralph Carmichael
    This arrangement was created for the male a cappella group Take Six, and appeared on their first album.
  • Offertory: Called to Love (original song)
    Adult Choir and Somebody's Mother: Meg Candilore, Anne Goodwin, Annette Sawyer
  • Postlude: Somebody's Mother
  • Hymns: 145, 287, 354, 413

Feb. 6 "Gnosticism" [MF preaching]

  • Prelude: Snow and Evergreen by Vijay Singh
  • Candle Music: Snow by Edward Elgar (1857-1934)
    Women of the Choir with Yaeko Miranda and Marissa Licata, violins
  • Anthem: Winter Prayer by Fenno Follensbea Heath, Jr. (1926-2008)
  • Offertory: The Snow Is Dancing by Claude Debussy (1862-1918)
  • Postlude: Toccata for Organ by Johann Kaspar Kerll (1627-1693)
  • Hymns: 23, 287, 291, 413

Feb. 13 "On Love and Loss"
Laura Prichard, Service Coordinator

  • Prelude: O, My Luv's Like a Red, Red Rose, (Scotland) arr. by James Mulholland, poem by Robert Burns
    Nice video of college choral performance: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HUA2gbMbwNo
    Click here to hear the text spoken with a proper Scottish accent
    Click here to read a discussion of the text
  • Hymn: Sacred Space composed for this church by Rafael Scarfullery
    Text by First Parish member Diane Taraz Shriver
    Opening Hymn: Sacred Space is the winner of the 2007 First Parish Arlington (MA) Hymn Competition. The text is by singer/songwriter Diane Taraz Shriver. Rafael Scarfullery is an internationally recognized classical guitarist, composer, and conductor who teaches at Sweet Briar College, Randolph College, and Lynchburg College in Virginia. He has organized six guitar festivals in the Dominican Republic and has performed throughout the Caribbean, South America, and the U.S.
  • Time for All Ages: Modern Juliet by Steph DeFerie & Traditional Juliet by William Shakespeare from Romeo and Juliet
    Allison Stillerman, Student Manager of the Chalice Singers Youth Choir and Dora Pereli, Music Coordinator for the First Parish Youth Group
  • Candle Music: She Moved Through the Fair (County Donegal, Ireland) arr. by Timothy Takach
    This song is an old ballad, a love song with a ghostly twist from County Donegal in the northwest corner of the Republic of Ireland. This setting for men’s voices is by Timothy Takach, a graduate of St. Olaf College and a bass in the professional men’s ensemble, Cantus.
    My young love said to me “My mother won’t mind,
    And my father won’t slight you for your lack of kind,”
    And she stepped away from me and this she did say,
    “It will not be long, love, ’til our wedding day.”
    She stepped away from me and she went through the fair.
    And fondly I watched her move here and move there.
    And then she went homeward with one star awake,
    As the swan in the evening moves over the lake.
    Last night she came to me, she came softly in.
    So softly she came that her feet made no din.
    And she laid her hand on me and this she did say,
    "It will not be long, love, 'til our wedding day."
  • Musical Reflection: Do You Love Me? by Jerry Bock from Fiddler on the Roof
    Caryn Sandrew and Alan Schweitzer, duet
  • Musical Reflection: Gathered Safely In by Diane Taraz Shriver
  • Canvass Testimonial: Maggie Orme-Johnson
  • Offertory: Once I Had a Sweetheart/When Will I Be Loved?
    First Parish UUlations, directed by Jennifer Kobayashi
  • Monologue: What Teachers Make by Taylor Mali
    Benjamin Matlack, Co-Leader of First Parish Youth Group
  • Postlude: Amaryllis (based on the Irish Tune My Lagan Love) by Diane Taraz Shriver
    One cold and gray midwinter day, when summer's smile had fled,
    I filled a pot of clay with earth and set it by my bed.
    The brownish bulb I planted there surely seemed as if it was dead,
    But when I soaked the thirsty soil, it came to life instead.

    First grew the root I could not see, fine tendrils curling tight,
    And then a leaf broke through the soil to revel in the light.
    Another soon was curving green, and a third leaf joined them overnight.
    They grew so fast that I did think they whispered in the night.

    And then a stalk sprang from the bulb and willed itself alive.
    It raised its head into the light with a single-minded drive.
    It soon had left the leaves below to soar toward the sky
    As if the ceiling wasn't there, and winter's frost outside.

    And then one morning I awoke and pulled the shade aside.
    Cold winter's hand lay on the land, and all, it seemed, had died.
    But by the window, bathed in light, like a sunbeam glorified,
    A flower sang its summery song, and laughed to be alive.

    What power dwells within the soil, and in the water's fall?
    This mystery I daily see, but cannot solve at all.
    The flower's tender beauty fades, that once held my heart in thrall.
    It sends its life back to the earth, and I can hear its call.
  • Speakers: Love and Marriage by Anna Watson; Love and Adoption by Eric Segal; Standing on the Side of Love in Arizona by Laura Prichard
  • Hymns: 124, 413, 1014
  • UUA-sponsored links re. this service:
    UUA-sponsored Public Advocacy Campaign - http://www.standingonthesideoflove.org/
    UU Sermons - http://www.uua.org/spirituallife/worshipweb/collections/151041.shtml

Feb. 20 “Living with Hope” Rev. Marta Morris Flanagan
Part I of a 3-part Sermon Series inspired by Dominique Moïsi’s
The Geopolitics of Emotion: How Cultures of Fear, Humiliation, and Hope are Reshaping the World
School vacation is Feb. 19-27

  • Prelude: You Are the New Day by John David, arr. Peter Knight
  • Candle Music: Piano Solo
  • Offertory: Deep in My Soul, op. 53, no. 2 (1908) by Sir Edward Elgar (1857-1934)
    Text by George Gordon Noel, Lord Byron (1788-1824) from The Corsair, Canto I: xiv, 1-2:
    Deep in my soul that tender secret dwells,
    Lonely and lost to light for evermore,
    Save when to thine my heart responsive swells,
    Then trembles into silence as before.

    There, in its centre, a sepulchral lamp
    Burns the slow flame, eternal - but unseen;
    Which not the darkness of Despair can damp,
    Though vain its ray as it had never been.
  • Postlude: Ba Dahohniih (Navajo Doxology) from the 1979 Navajo Hymnal
    Music celebrating our Youth Group's trip this week to the Navajo Nation in Arizona
    God jooba'ii baa dahohniih; God táa'go lá'í nándlíínii.
    God's grace is praised; God is present in all creatures.
    Yá'aash áádóó nihokáa'gi; t'áá'ánóltso baa dahohniih.
    Praise the world above us; all forms of him are praised.
  • Hymns & Readings: 108, 345, 391, 413

Feb. 27 “Living With Fear” Rev. Marta Morris Flanagan
Part 2 of a 3 Part Sermon Series inspired by Dominique Moïsi’s
The Geopolitics of Emotion: How Cultures of Fear, Humiliation, and Hope are Reshaping the World

  • Prelude: I Arise Facing East by Deborah Langstaff; Text by Mary Austin
    First Parish UUlations, directed by Jennifer Kobayashi
  • Anthem: Called to Love (original song, 2011)
    Somebody's Mother
  • Candle Music: Bright Morning Stars are Rising arr. by Paul Siskind
  • Offertory: When You Believe by Stephen Schwartz
  • Postlude: God be in My Head by John Rutter
  • Hymns & Readings: 106, 115, 119, 413

March 6 “Living With Shame” Rev. Marta Morris Flanagan
Part 2 of a 3 Part Sermon Series inspired by Dominique Moïsi’s
The Geopolitics of Emotion: How Cultures of Fear, Humiliation, and Hope are Reshaping the World

  • Prelude: Excerpts from the Morning Adhan (Pre-Dawn Call to Prayer)
    Laura Prichard, soprano
    The word "Islam" means "to submit" (to God's will). "Muslim" is the participle of "Islam," referring to one who submits. The adhan, or Islamic call to prayer, is an integral part of the Muslim faith, and is considered heightened speech, rather than music. It’s the first thing recited in the ears of a newborn babe, and it rings out in mosques, Islamic schools, homes, and on the street in Muslim communities five times a day. Women do not traditionally chant in this style, but there is a tradition of female singers and poets called awalim, linked to Aisha, wife of the Prophet Muhammad.

    One day the Prophet Muhammad’s companions were discussing how to gather everyone for prayer. Some suggested using a bell as Christians do, and others advised using a ram's horn, following ancient Jewish practice. Muhammad said, "The ink of the scholar is more sacred than the blood of a martyr." Then Umar, one of the Prophet's companions, suggested having one voice call others to prayer from the holy texts (this story and these words are found in the Sahih al-Bukhari, the most trusted collection of the sayings of Muhammad, after the Qu'ran):

    Allahu akbar. God is great.
    Hayya 'ala-salahh. Come to prayer.
    Hayya 'ala 'l-falah. Come to success.
    As-salatu khayru min an-nawm. Prayer is better than sleep.
    La ilaha illallah. There is no God but God.
    Hayya 'ala-salahh, hayya 'ala 'l-falah. Come to prayer. Come to success.
  • Anthem: Short People by Randy Newman (1943-)
    Chalice Singers and Adult Choir
    In celebration of our Youth and of Newman's 2011 Oscar win
  • Candle Music: MLK by U2
    Peter Southwick, Doug Davidoff, Jean Renard Ward, tenor soloists
  • Offertory: Reconciliation from Dona nobis pacem by Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)
    Michael Prichard, baritone; with Laurie Francis-Wright, Janice Hegeman, Laura Prichard, Andrew Leonard, and Jean Renard Ward
    Text for the Offertory by Walt Whitman (Leaves of Grass, 1900)
    WORD over all, beautiful as the sky!
    Beautiful that war, and all its deeds of carnage,
    must in time be utterly lost;
    That the hands of the sisters Death and Night,
    incessantly softly wash again, and ever again, this soil’d world:
    ... For my enemy is dead—a man divine as myself is dead;
    I look where he lies, white-faced and still, in the coffin—
    I draw near;
    I bend down, and touch lightly with my lips
    the white face in the coffin.
  • Postlude: Fuga by Dietrich Buxtehude (1637-1707)
  • Hymns & Readings: 205, 346, 368, 413

March 13 Spring Music Service
Based around texts drawn from the Song of Songs

  • Prelude: Huracan
    Tina Kambil (AHS '12), Bart Buurman (AHS '13), Bennet Parsons (AHS '14), and Joe Sax (Brookline HS, '11)
  • Musical Call to Worship: Nigra sum from Vespers (1610) by Claudio Monteverdi (1567-1643, Venice)
    Cindy Vredeveld, soprano; Carol Lewis, viola da gamba
    Nigra sum, sed formosa, filiae Jerusalem.
    I am black but beautiful, ye daughters of Jerusalem.
    Ideo dilexit me rex et introduxit me in cubiculum suum et dixit mihi:
    Therefore the king was delighed, brought me to his chamber and said:
    Surge, amica mea, et veni. Jam hiems transiit, imber abiit, et recessit.
    Arise, my love, and come. Winter has passed; rain is over and gone;
    Flores apparuerunt in terra nostra, tempus putationis advenit.
    Flowers have appeared in our land, the time of pruning has come.
    Song of Songs 1:5, 2:10-12
  • Time for All Ages: Song of Songs 1-2 (excerpts)
    I Am the Rose of Sharon
    by William Billings (1746-1800, Boston)
    I am the Rose of Sharon and the lily of the valley.
    As the Appletree, among the trees of the wood, so is my Beloved among the Sons.
    As the Lily among the thorns, so is my Love among the Daughters.
    I sat down under his shadow with great delight; his fruit was sweet to my taste.
    He brought me to the Banqueting House. His Banner over me was Love.
    Stay me with flagons, comfort me with apples, for I am sick of Love.
    I charge you, O ye Daughters of Jerusalem, by the roes and hinds of the field,
    that you stir not up nor awake, my love till he please. The voice of my beloved!
    Behold, he cometh, leaping upon the mountains, skipping upon the hills.
    My Beloved spake and said: Rise up, my Love, my fair one, and come away,
    for lo, the winter is past, the rain is over and gone.
  • Candle Music: Canzone Variée from Saxophone Quartet in B-flat Major, op. 109 by Alexander Glazunov (1865-1936, Leningrad/Paris)
  • Musical Reflection: Rise Up, My Love (1929) by Healey Willan (1880-1968, Toronto)
    Rise up my love, my fair one, and come away.
    For lo, the winter is past, the rain is over and gone;
    The flowers appear on the earth, The time of the singing of birds is come. Song of Songs 2:10-12
  • Offertory: Adagio and Tempo di Minuet by Carl Friedrich Abel (1723-1787, London)
  • Anthem: Fulcite me floribus (1742) by Francisco Valls (1665-1747, Barcelona)
    Fulcite me floribus, surround me with flowers, strengthen me with apples,
    Stipate me malis, quia amore langueo, for I languish with love. Song of Songs 2:5
  • Anthem: Ach, nun ist mein Jesus hin from the St. Matthew Passion by Bach 
    Cindy Vredevelt, soprano, with the First Parish Choir 
    Translation of the Candle Music: (Soloist: Alas, now my Jesus is gone!)
    - Where, then, has your beloved gone, O most beautiful among women? - 
    (Is it possible, can I behold it? )
    - Which way has your beloved gone? -  
    (Ah! My lamb is in the claws of a tiger.)
    - We will seek him with you. -  
    (What shall I say to the soul, when she asks me anxiously: Where has he gone?)
    The choir’s text in the Candle Music comes from the Song of Songs, chapter 6, verse 1. The choir’s German text was translated from the original Hebrew by Martin Luther. Bach inserted new words for the alto soloist to make “the beloved” of the Old Testament text relevant to his Lutheran audience, as this music comes from a large composition suitable for performance on Good Friday. In spite of the lack of explicitly religious content in this chapter of the Bible, composers often create settings of it for liturgical use. Some interpret the Song as an allegorical representation of the relationship between God and Israel, or for Christians, God and the Church, and in Bach’s case, between Jesus and the human soul, in marriage.
  • Reflections: Martin Malin, Dr. Richard Carter, Dr. Laura Prichard
  • Anthem: Pulchra es from the Vespers by Monteverdi
    Pulchra es, amica mea, suavis et decora sicut Jerusalem,
    Thou art beautiful, my love, sweet and comely as Jerusalem,
    terribilis ut castrorum acies ordinata.
    terrible as an army arrayed for battle.
    Averte oculos tuos a me, quia me avolare fecerunt.
    Turn thine eyes from me, for they make me flee. Song of Songs 6:4-5
  • Postlude: Pone me ut signaculum from Flos campi (1925)
    by Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958, London)
    This wordless chorus was inspired by the following text from Song of Songs 8:6, "Set me as a seal upon thine heart." The vocal parts recall an earlier part of the concerto, inspired by Songs of Songs 2:12, "The time of singing has come, and the voice of the turtle-dove has been heard in our land."
    Tina Kambil, alto saxophone; Anne Quaadras, flute
  • Hymns & Readings: 12, 14, 34, 430

March 20 “What Sustains Us?” Rev. William Gardiner

  • Prelude: Fantasia by Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck (1562-1621)
  • Anthem: Frage und Antwort by Hugo Distler (1908-1942)
  • Candle Music: In My Room by Brian Wilson (1942-)
  • Offertory: Prelude in G-flat major, op. 23, no. 10 by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943)
  • Postlude: Toccata by Johann Pachelbel (1653-1706)
  • Hymns & Readings: 18, 93, 360, 413

March 27 "Margaret Fuller's Legacy for Us Today" Rev. Dr. Dorothy Emerson

  • Notes on the Speaker: The Rev. Dr. Dorothy May Emerson is a Unitarian Universalist community minister with Rainbow Solutions in Medford, Massachusetts, where she focuses on connecting spirituality, money, and justice; consults with justice-making organizations; and is the coordinator of the Margaret Fuller Bicentennial. Her writings include Standing Before Us: Unitarian Universalist Women and Social Reform 1776-1936 and the new curriculum Becoming Women of Wisdom: Marking the Passage into the Crone Years. She is currently working on a memoir on the 1960s.
  • Prelude: Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 by Johann S. Bach (1685-1750)
    First Parish Flute Loops
    Alyson Schultz, Anne Quaadgras, Jean Nagle, Mies Boet-Whitaker, Ted Live, Tina Kambil, Stephanie Franzosa, and Willemien Insinger
  • Candle Music: Minuet by Wolfgang A. Mozart (1756-1791)
    First Parish Flute Loops
  • Special Hymn: New Worlds Manifest
    Winner of the Margaret Fuller Bicentennial Hymn Competition
  • Offertory: The Passion-Flower by Kenneth Seitz
    Poem by Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), who was featured in Alliance speaker Rev. Dorothy Emerson's talk
    THE PASSION-FLOWER

    My love gave me a passion-flower.
    I nursed it well - so brief its hour!
    My eyelids ache, my throat is dry:
    He told me that it would not die.

    My love and I are one, and yet
    Full oft my cheeks with tears are wet -
    So sweet the night is and the bower!
    My love gave me a passion-flower.

    So sweet! Hold fast my hands. Can God
    Make all this joy revert to sod,
    And leave to me but this for dower -
    My love gave me a passion-flower.
  • Postlude: Viennese Refrain
    First Parish Flute Loops
  • Hymns & Readings: 6, 108, 413

Apr. 3 Youth Service

  • Prelude: Help, I'm Alive by Emily Haines
    Lyda Langford and Dora Pereli, vocals, George Pereli, piano, Adam Kaminsky, guitar
  • Candle Music: Mad World by Michael Andrews
    Kay McPhail & Grace McKay, vocals, Chris Hamblin, piano, Misha Berkrot, guitar
  • Offertory: Chasing Pavements by Adele
    Annie Whitford & Gabby Hakim, vocals, Eric Candilore, piano, Andrew Friedman, guitar, Billy Franzosa, drums
  • Interlude: Into the Ocean by Justin Furstenfeld
    Misha Berkrot, vocals/guitar, Erid Candilore, bass, Matt Davis, ukulele, Bily Franzosa, drums, Adam Kaminski, guitar, Chris Hamblin, piano
  • Postlude: Don't Fear the Reaper by Donald Roeser
    Tim Boet-Whitaker, vocals, Erid Candilore, bass, Andrew Friedman, cowbell, Bily Franzosa, drums, Adam Kaminski & Ben Matlack, guitar, Chris Hamblin, piano
  • Reflections on Fear: Ben Matlack, Lizzy Quinn, Annie Whitford, Lucas Jaffe
  • Hymns & Readings: 146, 160, 413, Poem by Robert Harrelson, Litany on Fear, Sweat Lodge Prayers

Apr. 10 "Being a Good Bystander/Bullying"

  • Prelude: Andante by G.F. Handel (1685-1759)
  • Anthem: Ein Stündlein wohl vor Tag by Hugo Distler (1908-1942)
    Translation of the poem (1847) by Eduard Mörike
    As I lay sleeping, a moment before dawn,
    A little swallow sang to me from the tree outside my window;
    I could hardy hear it in that moment before dawn.

    Oh woe, sing to me no more!
    Oh be still, I won't listen!
    Alas, my dream of love and truth faded in that moment before dawn.
  • Candle Music: That Lonesome Road by James Taylor (1948-)
  • Offertory: Excerpt from Andantino by Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953)
  • Postlude: Toccata in F Major by Dietrich Buxtehude (1637-1707)
  • Hymns & Readings: 40, 124, 186, 413

Apr. 17 "Passover"
School vacation is Apr. 16-24/Passover is Apr. 18-26

  • Prelude: Bagatelle by Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
  • Candle Music: He Sent a Thick Darkness from Handel's Israel in Egypt
    Kenneth Seitz, conductor
  • Offertory: But as for His People from Handel's Israel in Egypt
  • Postlude: Themes from Sonata No. 5 by Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953)
  • Hymns & Readings: 104, 122, 210, 453, 632

Apr. 17 Chalice Singers @ Unitarian Church of Montréal, Canada
"Beloved Community" by Nicoline Guerrier

  • Prelude: The Younger Generation by Aaron Copland (1900-1990)
    A Girl's Garden by Randall Thompson (1899-1984)
  • Chalice Lighting Hymn: This Little Light of Mine
  • Candle Music: Hymne au Printemps by Felix Leclerc
  • Offertory: Oh, What a Beautiful Morning from Oklahoma!
    Michael Prichard, baritone
  • Anthem: Julian of Norwich
  • Postlude: Hymn
  • Hymns & Readings: 118, 209, 270, 323, 413

Apr. 24 Intergenerational Easter Services [MF preaching]

  • Prelude: I Am the Rose of Sharon (1778) by William Billings (1746-1800)
    Online score - http://www2.cpdl.org/wiki/images/sheet/billings/bill-ros.pdf
    Online midi practice file - http://www1.cpdl.org/wiki/images/sound/billings/bill-ros.mid
    I am the Rose of Sharon and the lily of the valley.
    As the Appletree, among the trees of the wood, so is my Beloved among the Sons.
    As the Lily among the thorns, so is my Love among the Daughters.
    I sat down under his shadow with great delight; his fruit was sweet to my taste.
    He brought me to the Banqueting House. His Banner over me was Love.
    Stay me with flagons, comfort me with apples, for I am sick of Love.
    I charge you, O ye Daughters of Jerusalem, by the roes and hinds of the field,
    that you stir not up nor awake, my love till he please. The voice of my beloved!
    Behold, he cometh, leaping upon the mountains, skipping upon the hills.
    My Beloved spake and said: Rise up, my Love, my fair one, and come away,
    for lo, the winter is past, the rain is over and gone.
  • Anthem: Rise Up, My Love (1929) by Healey Willan (1880-1968, Toronto)
    Rise up my love, my fair one, and come away.
    For lo, the winter is past, the rain is over and gone;
    The flowers appear on the earth, The time of the singing of birds is come. Song of Songs 2:10-12
  • Offertory: Presto from Sonata in E-flat Major by Joseph Haydn (1732-1809)
    Carl Schlaikjer, oboe
  • Matzoh Communion Music: Air by J. S. Bach (1685-1750)
  • Postlude: Carillon by Léon Boëllman (1862-1897)
    Carl Schlaikjer, oboe
  • Hymns & Readings: 61, 220, 269, 270, 413, 545

May 1 "Labor"/May Day/Yom HaShoah [MF preaching]

  • Prelude: Lied (No. 17 from 24 Pièces en style libre, 1914-15) by Louis Vierne (1870-1937)
  • Anthems: Shalom Rav by Ben Steinberg (1930-)
    Meditation on Steinberg's Shalom Rav by Sarah Haera Tocco
    Cantors: Laurie Francis-Wright; Holly Loring; Dorothy May; Janice Hegeman
    Notes: Composer Ben Steinberg, son of the late Cantor Alexander Steinberg, was born in Winnipeg, Canada and educated at Toronto's Royal Conservatory of Music and the University of Toronto. Involved in traditional synagogue music since childhood (he was a child soloist at age eight and conducted his first synagogue choir at age twelve) his career is a long and distinguished one. Having served Toronto's Temple Sinai as Director of Music since 1970, Mr. Steinberg was appointed its Composer-in-Residence in 1996. He is a widely-recognized conductor and lecturer, noted for his lecture-recitals on Jewish music history and style at major centers and universities in Canada and the U.S., including Cornell University, where he has twice been invited as Dean Sage Speaker. His works have been commissioned by numerous synagogues and other groups such as: The Royal Canadian College of Organists; The American Guild of Organists; Yale University in conjunction with Union Theological Seminary and Hebrew Union College (NYC); and The American Conference of Cantors. He was invited by Israel's 1988 Zimriah (Choral Festival) to lecture on his choral compositions. Earlier, he was honored twice by the city of Jerusalem, which invited him to be an artist-in-residence at its creative retreat, "Mishkenot Sha'ananim" - an honor then reserved for composers, artists and writers of international stature.
    Biography at Temple Sinai, Toronto: http://www.templesinai.net/who_we_are/senior_staff.php?page=182
  • Candle Music: Choral (No. 16 from 24 Pièces en style libre, 1914-15) by Louis Vierne (1870-1937)
  • Offertory: Kumah Echa by Shlomo Postolsky, arr. by Alice Parker
    This work song celebrates the dawning of a new day. The Chermeish (scythe), represents the tool of a rural community. The Anach (plumb-bob), represents the tool of the city.
    Kuma, echa, sov va-sov, Rise up, brothers, spin round and round,
    Al tanucha, shovah shov. Don’t stop to rest, return again.
    Ein kan rosh, v’ein kan sof, There’s no beginning and there’s no end,
    Yad el yad, al ta'azov! Hand in hand, don’t leave!
    Yom shaka v’yom yizrach, A day goes, a new day comes shining
    Anu neifen ach el ach, We turn, brother to brother,
    Min hak’far umin hak’rach From the village and from the city
    B’chermeish uvaanach. We come with scythe and plumb-line.
    Kuma, kadima, kuma Rise up, let’s go, rise up
    Chevraya, shova yachad! Comrades, return together!
    Tamid ovdim b’yachad Always working together
    Yad el yad ad ein sof! Hand in hand to eternity!
    Kuma, sova, echa. Rise up, spin, brothers.
  • Postlude: Finale from Sonata No. 5 by Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953)
  • Hymns & Readings: 38, 109, 157, 413, 438, Short Kaddish for Yom HaShoah

May 8 "Endurance" Mother's Day [MF preaching]

  • Prelude: Overture to Candide by Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990)
    Family Orchestra
  • RE Procession/Parade of Classes: The Younger Generation by Aaron Copland (1900-1990)
    Chalice Singers
  • Candle Music: Quam pulchra es by John Dunstable (1390-1453)
    Adult Choir
  • Offertory: Closely Dancing by Arturo Sandoval (1949-)
    Benjamiz Matlack, trumpet
  • Postlude: Finale from Overture to Candide by Bernstein
  • Hymns & Readings:

    May 14 Home Cookin' Coffeehouse "On Broadway"

    • UUlations
    • UUphonics with Kenneth Seitz
    • Caryn Sandrew and Jim Austin
    • Starring: Ben Sears & Brad Conner, featuring a special set of songs from Fred Astaire films

    May 15 "On Being a Servant" [MF preaching]

    • Prelude: Kate Roberts, cello; Barbara Tilson, piano
    • Candle Music: The Servant Song
    • Offertory: Set Down, Servant by Robert Shaw
      Caryn Sandrew, alto; Alan Schweitzer and John Hodges, basses
    • Postlude: Kate Roberts, cello; Barbara Tilson, piano
    • Hymns & Readings:

    May 22 [MF preaching]

    • Prelude: Adagio in B-flat major, K.V. 411 by W. A. Mozart (1756-1791)
      Woodwind Quintet: Mies Boet-Whitaker, flute; Carl Schlaikjer, oboe; Michelle Markus, clarinet; John Chapin, hon; Nei Fairbairn, bassoon
    • Interlude: Pastorale from Album opur mes petits amis, op. 14, no. 1 by Gabriel Pierné (1863-1937)
    • Candle Music: Zoriu byut (Reveille) by Georgy Vasil’evich Sviridov (1915-1998)
      Jennifer Kobayashi, soprano; Andrew Kobayashi, bass, Meg Candilore, alto
      Sviridov, born in the Kursk region of Russia, studied with Dmitri Shostakovich at Leningrad Conservatory. He is the strongest contemporary link to Russia’s monumental musical past, and such composers as Glinka, Musorgsky, and Rachmaninoff. The key forces in Sviridov’s works are religion and narodnost’: a nineteenth century literary concept that refers to a nation’s spirit through the ages. Sviridov’s works are permeated with prominent characteristics of narodnost’: ritual as an act of relinking with the past, an inimitably Russian ‘sociability’ as an expression of sincerity and depth of emotion; the epic style as a means for philosophical overview; musical symbolism (in particular, ‘bell’ effects); the lyrical style as the voice of nature; and the chorus as the symbol and voice of the people. His style is programmatic and incorporates rich vocal expressive devices and frequent dissonance within an overridingly tonal framework.
      A Pushkin Wreath is a musical ‘book of poems’ (10) by Aleksandr Pushkin (1799- 1837), Russia’s greatest poet. No. 7, Zoriu byut, exhibits typical Sviridov traits: long note values, a solo line over a hummed choral texture, intricate divisi lines, elaborate dynamic effects, and static harmony. The composer imposes his own peculiar pacing and acoustical effects: time appears to be “frozen,” and movement is accomplished through space and color. (Condensed from Musica Russica notes by Peter Jermihov, c. 1995)
      Zoriu byut... iz ruk moih They’re sounding reveille... from my hands
      Vethiy Dante vipadayet, The ancient Dante falls,
      Na ustah nachatiy stih On my lips a nascent verse,
      Nedochitanniy zatih - Half-read, falls silent,
      Duh dalioko uletayet. The spirit soars into the distance.
      Zvuk privichniy, zvuk zhivoy, Ah, familiar sound, lively sound!
      Kak ti chasto razdavalsia How often you sounded
      Tam, gde tiho razvivalsia There, where I quietly grew up
      Ya davnishneyu poroy. In days long past.
      Zoriu byut... They’re sounding reveille...
    • Offertory: Adagio in B-flat major, op. 71 by Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
    • Postlude: Ugrós (Leaping Dance) by Ferenc Farkas (1905-2000) from Régi magyar tancók a 17. századból fúvósötösre (Early Hungarian dances from the seventeenth century for wind quintet)
    • Hymns & Readings: 6, 17, 128, 295, 391, Excerpt from Divinity School Address (1838) by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Congregational Blessing of 11 graduating seniors

    May 29 Memorial Day Weekend
    Standing on the Side of Love by Betty-Jeanne Rueters-Ward

    • Prelude: Variations on "Now Let Us Sing" by Daniel Rueters-Ward
    • Candle Music: Adagio, ma non troppo from Oboe Cocerto in C Minor by Benedetto Marcello (1686-1739)
      Carl Schlaikjer, oboe; Sarah Tocco, piano
    • Offertory: Moderato from Oboe Cocerto in C Minor by Benedetto Marcello (1686-1739)
      Carl Schlaikjer, oboe; Sarah Tocco, piano
    • Postlude: Improvisation on Jason Shelton's Fire of Commitment
      Daniel Rueters-Ward, guitar
    • Hymns & Readings: 577, 1028 Fire of Commitment, 1014 Standing on the Side of Love

    June 5 [MF preaching]

    • Prelude: A Girl's Garden by Randall Thompson
      Chalice Singers Youth Choir; Poem by Robert Frost
    • Candle Music, Second Offertory, Postlude: Sarah Haera Tocco, piano
    • Offertory: Signed, Sealed, Delivered by Stevie Wonder
      Arrangement by Deke Sharon (1990) and the MIT Logarhythms (1999)
    • Hymns & Readings:

    June 12 Intergenerational Flower Communion Service [MF preaching]
    AHS Graduation

    • Prelude: Organ
    • Anthem/Candle/Flower Music: The Passion-Flower by Kenneth Seitz
      Mies Boet-Whitaker, flute; Poem by Margaret Fuller (1810-1850)
      THE PASSION-FLOWER
      My love gave me a passion-flower.
      I nursed it well - so brief its hour!
      My eyelids ache, my throat is dry:
      He told me that it would not die.

      My love and I are one, and yet
      Full oft my cheeks with tears are wet -
      So sweet the night is and the bower!
      My love gave me a passion-flower.

      So sweet! Hold fast my hands. Can God
      Make all this joy revert to sod,
      And leave to me but this for dower -
      My love gave me a passion-flower.
    • Offertory: Iris by Kenneth Seitz
    • {There will be an Evacuation Drill during the service -- postlude will be outdoors and a cappella.}
    • Postlude: I am Come into my Garden by William Billings (1746-1800, Boston)
      pp. 1-5 only
    • Hymns & Readings:

    June 19 {Summer Services Begin}
    "Grow Up and Pay Your Taxes" by Rachel Stark

    • Service Music: Kenneth Seitz, piano

    June 26
    "Poetry as Celebration and Spiritual Path" coordinated by Cathie Desjardins, Kenneth Seitz, piano

    • Prelude: Poem from Five Poems after Omar Khayyam, op. 41, no. 1 by Arthur Foote (1853-1937)
      Iram indeed is gone with all his Rose,
      And Jamshyd's Seven-ringed Cup where no one knows;
      But still a Ruby kindles in the Vine,
      And many a Garden by the Water blows.
    • Offertory: Poem, op. 41, no. 4 by Foote
      A Book of Vespers, underneath the Bough,
      A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread–and Thou
      Beside me singing in the Wilderness–
      Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow!
    • Postlude: Poem by Zdenek Fibich (1850-1900)
    • Hymns & Readings: 301, 330, Odes, For I Will Consider My Cat Jeoffry from Jubilate Agno by Christopher Smart (1722-1771)

    July 3
    "Loving My Country" by Lori Kenshaft

    • Service Music: Kenneth Seitz, piano

    July 10
    "1975 Church Fire and Rebuilding" by Oakes Plimpton

    • Service Music: Kenneth Seitz, piano
    • Hymns & Readings: 123, 164, 169, 352

    July 17 {Summer Service}
    "A Self-Care Approach to Compassion and Empathy" by P.J. Gardiner and the Compassionate Communication Group
    Service Music: First Parish Woodwind Trio
    Willemien Insinger, flute; Carl Schlaikjer, oboe and English horn; Michell Markus, clarinet and bass clarinet

    • Prelude: Wondrous Love, arr. by Carl Schlaikjer
    • Candle Music: Les Moutons: gavotte célèbre by G. B. Martini (1706-1784), arranged for trio by Darius Milhaud (1892-1974)
    • Offertory: Aubade by Paul de Wailly (1854-1933)
    • Postlude: Pine Apple Rag (1908) by Scott Joplin (1868-1917), arranged by Bill Holcombe (1924-2010)
    • Hymns & Readings: 95, 131, 402

    July 24
    "Green Sanctuary/Climate Change" by Bill Gardiner, Ricky Carter, and David Landskov

    • Prelude (before bell): Allegro from Divertimento No. 1 in F major, KV 439b by W. A. Mozart (1756-1791)
      Andrew Friedman, Ted Live, Anne Quaadgras, flute trio
    • Prelude (after bell): Opening Flourish from Fig Leaf Rag by Scott Joplin (1867-1917)
      Andrew Friedman, Ted Live, Laura Prichard, Anne Quaadgras, flute quartet
    • Candle Music: I Got Me Flowers from Five Mystical Songs by Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)
      Text from Easter (1633) by George Herbert (1593-1633)
      Michael Prichard, baritone; Ted Live, Andrew Friedman, flutes; Laura Prichard, piano
      Poem from The Temple (1633) by Anglican priest George Herbert (1593-1633)
      I got me flowers to strew thy way;
      I got me boughs off many a tree:
      But thou wast up by break of day,
      And brought'st thy sweets along with thee.
      The Sunne arising in the East.
      Though he give light, and th'East perfume;
      If they should offer to contest
      With thy arising, they presume.
      Can there be any day but this,
      Though many sunnes to shine endevour?
      We count three hundred, but we misse:
      There is but one, and that one ever.
    • Song: This Land is Your Land (1940) by Woody Guthrie (1912-1967)
      Emily Ranken, voice, guitar, and additional lyrics
    • Guthrie composed his lyrics in response to Irving Berlin’s “God Bless America.” His original title was “God Blessed America for Me,” and he varied the lyrics each time he sang it. Most of the melody came from a Carter family recording of “When the World’s on Fire,” arranged from a Baptist hymn entitled “Oh, my Living Brother.”

    • Offertory: How Can I Keep from Singing arranged by Nora Kile (1958-)
      Flute Trio with piano
      This hymn (listed in our hymnal as “My Life Flows On in Endless Song”) was composed by Robert Wadsworth Lowry, an American Baptist minister. The original words, published in the New York Observer on August 7, 1868. In the early twentieth century, it was not widely used in congregational worship, but Pete Seeger learned the song from Doris Plenn, a family friend, whose family sang it in North Carolina. Pete Seeger’s version, with some of Plenn’s modifications, has become popular in both the Quaker and Unitarian traditions.
    • Postlude: The Impossible Dream (The Quest) by Mitch Leigh (1928-)
      Michael Prichard, baritone; Laura Prichard, piano
    • To dream the impossible dream, to fight the unbeatable foe,
      To bear with unbearable sorrow, to run where the brave dare not go,
      To right the unrightable wrong, to love pure and chaste from afar,
      To try when your arms are too weary to reach the unreachable star:

      This is my quest to follow that star, no matter how hopeless, no matter how far,
      To fight for the right without question or pause, 
      To be willing to march into Hell for a heavenly cause.
      And I know if I'll only be true to this glorious quest,

      That my heart will lie peaceful and calm when I'm laid to my rest.

       

      And the world will be better for this: that one man, scorned and covered with scars,

      Still strove with his last ounce of courage, to reach the unreachable star.
                  Lyric from Man of La Mancha (1963) by Joe Darion (1917-2011)

      Notes: This musical started out as a non-musical teleplay (1959) based on Miguel Cervantes’ seventeenth-century masterwork Don Quixote. Mitch Leigh, who has become one of the two main supporters of the Yale School of Music, composed songs for the new production. Carlyle Hall, a jazz trumpet player and student of Béla Bartók wrote the orchestrations (with no violins, violas, or cellos). The completed show was premiered at the Goodspeed Opera House in East Haddam, CT in 1964 and had its New York premiere in 1965.

    • Hymns & Readings: 21, 44, 163

    July 31
    "The Sources of Our Faith" by Michelle Bates Deakin, Dave Deakin, Carolyn Hodges, Chris Jones, Sandy King, Jim Hall

    • Service Music: Jim Austin, piano with Drew and Dora Pereli

    August 7
    "What's on Your T-Shirt?" by Ricky Carter and Janet Blodgett

    • Service Music: Sarah Haera Tocco, piano and organ

    August 14
    "Muddling Through: Engaging in a World that has no Right Answers" by Robin and Sam Richardson

    • Service Music: Sarah Haera Tocco, piano and organ

    August 21
    "Practicing Gratitude in Meditation and Everyday Living" by Tom Hogan and Daniel Zabel

    • Service Music: Sarah Haera Tocco, piano and organ
    • Hymns & Readings: 90, 128

    September 4
    "Being Wrong" by Elizabeth Hunter

    • Service Music: Kenneth Seitz, piano

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